Playing the transgender trump card

A Maine school district will pay $75,000 to settle a discrimination lawsuit because a transgender girl (who’s biologically male) was told to use a private staff restroom, rather than the girls’ room, reports AP.

Access to a private restroom is worth $75,000?

Nicole Maines was using the girls’ bathroom in her Orono  elementary school until the grandfather of a fifth-grade boy complained to administrators.

In Minnesota, biological males who “self-identify” as females will be allowed to compete on girls’ sports teams.

Physically male students will share locker rooms and showers with girls, warned the Minnesota Child Protection League.

“Just the mere presence of a male in a girls’ bathroom I can tell you is going to make those girls feel uncomfortable, intimidated, and the potential for them to be emotionally distraught over that certainly exists,” said Michele Lentz, state coordinator for the Minnesota Child Protection League.

In addition, girls will have to compete with bigger, more muscular males, said Lentz.

Only about five transgender students a year in the entire country ask to be on a team that’s not aligned with their birth gender, said Helen Carroll, sports project director for The National Center for Lesbian Rights.

. . . A 2011 NCAA report found that transgender athletes had no competitive advantage over non-transgender athletes.

Sharing showers isn’t a problem, because transgender girls “are very private people,” said Carroll.  “They want to have privacy areas in the locker room, they don’t want to shower with other students.”

What if a transgender girl wants to assert her right to use the locker room like other girls?

Boys, girls and ‘genderbread persons’


Teachers aren’t supposed to refer to “boys and girls” or “ladies and gentlemen” in Lincoln, Nebraska schools, lest transgender students feel excluded or be bullied, reports Watchdog. Suggested terms include “campers,” “readers” and “purple penguins.” If absolutely necessary, they can say “boys, girls, both or neither.”

Training documents tell teachers how to avoid creating a “gendered space.” Among the 12 steps:

Step 5: “When you find it necessary to reference gender, say ‘boy, girl, both or neither,” the handout said. “When asked why, use this as a teachable moment. Emphasize to students that your classroom recognizes and celebrates the gender diversity of all students.”

Step 8: “Be intolerant of openly hostile attitudes or references towards others… on their statements about gender. Being punitive may stop the behavior, at least in your presence. Being instructive may stop it entirely.”

Step 10: “Avoid using ‘normal’ to define any behaviors.”

Teachers also received a handout on “The Genderbread Person.”

I wonder how many Lincoln teachers will have a transgender student this year. One? Two?

Schools prepare for transgender rights

California schools are preparing for a transgender students’ rights law by “reviewing locker room layouts” and ” scheduling sensitivity training for coaches,” reports AP.  Above all, does the school have a private restroom for transgender students or will a biological boy be allowed in the girls’ room?

However the law, which lets public school children use the sex-segregated facilities of their choice, could be suspended within days of its Jan. 1 launch if a referendum to repeal it qualifies for the ballot.

Ashton Lee, 16, a junior at Manteca High School in the San Joaquin Valley, was born female but wants to be treated as male. Last year, he asked to be transferred from an all-girls aerobics class to a team sports class for boys. School officials said no. They reconsidered in the fall.

He now is allowed to use the boy’s restrooms and locker rooms and to wear the junior ROTC uniform for male cadets.

Similar adjustments have been made for five transgender classmates.

Manteca High, located in a conservative rural area, has 1,648 students of which six have declared themselves to be transgender. That seems like a very high number to me. Why has transgender status gone from incredibly rare to . . . not very unusual?

A (anatomical) boy in the girl’s restroom

A boy who identifies as a girl has the right to use the girls’ restroom and play on girls’ sports teams, the Massachusetts Department of Education has told schools. Transgender girls have the right to use boys’ restrooms and play on boys’ teams.

The guidance said some students may feel uncomfortable sharing those facilities with a transgender student but this ‘‘discomfort is not a reason to deny access to the transgender student.’’

Students who “consistently and intentionally refuse to refer to a transgendered student by the name or sex” they choose should face discipline for bullying, the guidance advised.

Maine rights panel backs down

Once eager to ban “biology-based” school restrooms, locker rooms and sports teams, the Maine Human Rights Commission has shelved guidelines that covered everything from preschool to college, reports Fox News.  The panel canceled a public hearing on how schools should accommodate transgender students and postponed indefinitely work on a “Sexual Orientation in Schools and Colleges” brochure.

Maine rights panel bans biology

“Biology-based restrooms, locker rooms and sports teams discriminate against transgendered students, says the Maine Human Rights Commission.

. . . Last year, the commission ruled that, under the Maine Human Rights Act, a school had discriminated against a 12-year-old transgender boy by denying him access to the girls’ bathroom.

The transgendered boy’s parents sued after the school told him to use the single-stall faculty restroom, rather than the girls’ room.

The  commission will issue guidelines for schools from preschools to universities, including “some private schools,” Fox reported.

A transgendered boy might feel uncomfortable in a boys’ bathroom or locker room. Wouldn’t a whole lot of girls feel uncomfortable encountering him in a girls’ restroom or locker room?

Coaches are worried about the effect on women’s sports if males can compete on women’s teams.