Transfers diversify selective colleges

Selective colleges and universities are pursuing community college achievers who can provide racial, ethnic and socioeconomic diversity.

Districts of Choice compete for students

California’s Districts of Choice are competing for students, writes June Kronholz in Education Next.  State law lets choice districts accept transfers without approval from students’ home districts.

The Riverside Unified School District east of Los Angeles was losing enrollment till it expanded choice options and opened the door to transfers.

. . . the district launched a science and technology middle school, a dual-language immersion elementary, an all-digital high school, an arts-centered grade school, a virtual school starting at grade 3, and more. Kids from other districts could enroll in the new programs, or, if the programs were oversubscribed, could enter admissions lotteries and, in some cases, stood the same chance of winning as Riverside youngsters.

Ninth-grade students at Riverside STEM Academy work together in a STEM Research Methodologies class

Ninth-grade students at Riverside STEM Academy work together in a STEM Research Methodologies class.
(Photo/Courtesy Riverside STEM Academy)

 

In 2013–14, the third choice year, 535 students transferred in to Riverside schools. Enrollment — and state funding — rose.

Thirty-one districts in the state have declared themselves “districts of choice.”

Districts can’t recruit star athletes or other outstanding students, writes Kronholz. ” Transfers can’t exacerbate racial segregation, and a district can’t take so many students that the transfers undermine another district’s financial stability.” They can’t reject special education students or  English Learners.

The law is controversial, writes Kronholz. Riverside parents aren’t always happy to see transfers compete for seats in popular programs.

Superintendents are wary of upsetting colleagues in neighboring districts, says Adonai Mack of the school administrators association. Many superintendents “aren’t entrepreneurial,” he adds.

Gates: It’s completion, not costs

Completion is a bigger problem than rising college costs, argues Bill Gates.

Completion numbers are better than previously reported, according to a new analysis which tracks more students, including transfers,

Who’s a graduate?

The U.S. Education Department plans to start counting part-time and transfer students in official graduation rates, but figuring out how to do it will be difficult without tracking individual students.

Solving the smugness problem

Elite colleges can solve the smugness problem by admitting community college transfers.

Also on Community College Spotlight: Here’s how to succeed in community college and beyond, writes Isa Adney in a new book geared to first-generation college students.

Community is back on TV, but will its characters ever graduate?

Counting transfers will raise completion rates

Hit for low graduation rates, community colleges will will more than double completion counts by including transfers.

“Tuning” college courses will help students transfer their credits, it’s hoped. First, faculty at different colleges and universities have to agree about what students should learn in specific courses.

Billions for college, but we don’t know grad rates

What’s the college graduation rate? Nobody knows because federal data leaves out or miscounts so many students. It’s time to track individual students’ progress, including transfers, part-timers and second-time-around students, an analyst argues.

Also on Community College Spotlight: A college’s quality isn’t measured by the completion rate.

Colleges question dual enrollees' readiness

Many more high school students are earning college credits through dual-enrollment programs, but some colleges question whether they’re truly doing college-level work. More colleges also are refusing to give credit to students who’ve passed AP exams.

Also on Community College Spotlight: Fewer California community college students are transferring to the California State system, while more are choosing private and out-of-state colleges and universities. That’s much more expensive, but not if students factor in the time it will take to get the courses they need and complete a degree.

College is the best mobility strategy

College is the best mobility strategy — but watch out for debt.

Also on Community College Spotlight:  Community college transfers let elite colleges add a little socioeconomic diversity.

CC students want more online classes

Community colleges can’t keep up with student demand for online classes.

Also on Community College Spotlight:  A common core curriculum for CUNY’s two-year and four-year colleges would help transfer students complete a bachelor’s degree, but many professors oppose the Pathways plan, saying it would devalue the CUNY degree.