Resegregation now

Large and medium-sized “school districts in the South have steadily resegregated” when freed from court supervision, according to a Stanford School of Education study published in the fall issue of the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management.

“Many of the gains that resulted from the Brown decision are being lost,” said Sean Reardon, a professor of education at Stanford and lead author of Brown Fades: The End of Court-Ordered School Desegregation and the Resegregation of American Public Schools.

Suburban schools are failing to integrate disadvantaged minority students, concludes a new book, The Resegregation of Suburban Schools, edited by Erica Frankenberg and Gary Orfield. “The United States today is a suburban nation that thinks of race as an urban issue, and often assumes that it has been largely solved,” write the editors. Not so.

Charter schools work for disadvantaged kids

Urban charter schools and those serving disadvantaged children improve achievement, while suburban charters and schools serving advantaged students lower achievement, concludes a Mathematica Working Paper. The study compared the achievement of charter middle school students with others who applied for the charter but lost a lottery and had to enroll elsewhere.