Did anti-bullying video lead to shooting?

An anti-bullying video that showed a girl bringing a gun to school may have influenced the 12-year-old shooter at Sparks Middle School, reports KRNV-TV in Reno.

Amaya Newton, an eighth grader, said the video was shown on Oct. 11, the last school day before the shootings.

“It was an anti-bullying movie but it could have gotten into his head about the girl scaring the bullies with the gun. She brought a gun on the bus to scare them and threatened to kill them,” Amaya told News 4.

Asked about the video’s message, she said, ”That maybe it’s easier to scare your bullies than just to tell a teacher.”

The shooter was harassed by classmates, Amaya said. “Like tripping him in the hallways, bugging him for money . . . ” He never spoke up.

Community college violence raise fears

A wave of senseless violence at community college campuses is raising fears. An 18-year-old student has been charged with wounding two women at a branch campus in a shopping mall near Virginia Tech, the site of mass killings in 2007. Students say the gunmen tried to lure them out of hiding by pretending to be the police, but nobody believed him.

Several community colleges across the nation have been the scene of gun and knife attacks in recent months.

School trip shows ‘i-Combat’ to kids

New York City students visited a simulated shooting game facility on a school day, reports NBC.  Bronx High School of Visual Arts students, led by a teacher, had a chance to see a new shooting game for children called iCombat at Indoor Extreme Sports.

 iCombat outfits children like SWAT officers and lets them pretend to have shootouts in an indoor fake village . . .  The level of the realism in the game has sparked concerns in the law enforcement community and among child psychologists.

Students were members of a school club, said district officials. “A mistake was clearly made,” Chancellor Dennis Walcott told NBC.

High school coach shoots armed teens

A Detroit high school coach shot two teens who attacked him as he was walking two female basketball players to their cars after dark, reports WXYZ. He killed one and wounded the other.

One attacker pulled a gun and grabbed the 70-year-old man by his chain necklace, the coach told police. He pulled his gun and shot both. A reserve police officer, the coach has a concealed pistol license.

Both attackers had attended the high school; one had been expelled recently, reports WXYZ.

Armed guard disarms school shooter

An Atlanta middle-school student shot a classmate yesterday in the school courtyard. An armed security guard — an off-duty police officer — took the gun away. The 14-year-old victim has been discharged from the hospital.

Ida Price MIddle School students must walk through a metal detector to enter the school. It’s not clear how the shooter got the gun into the school.

An armed police officer and an unarmed guard will be stationed at every elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut, if the school board can persuade the local police to provide the manpower.

After the Dec. 14 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, some parents who attended the school board meeting asked for  two armed guards at each school. ”The only thing that stopped that guy that day was when the two Newtown police burst in the building,” said parent Donna Lorenz.

Lawyer withdraws Newtown suit — for now

That $100 million lawsuit claiming Connecticut failed to protect Sandy Hook Elementary students has been withdrawn, but could be refiled.

“I received new evidence on security at the school, which I need to evaluate,” (lawyer Irving) Pinsky said Monday.

The suit was filed in the name of “Jill Doe,” a six-year-old girl who survived the massacre but allegedly was traumatized by hearing screams, cursing and gunshots on the intercom. Pinsky said the suit’s goal was to improve school safety, not to make money. Of course.

The Sandy Hook lawsuits begin

Twenty children and six adults were gunned down at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Now the parents of a 6-year-old survivor are suing the school for $100 million because their child heard “cursing, screaming, and shooting” over the school intercom. “As a consequence, the … child has sustained emotional and psychological trauma and injury, the nature and extent of which are yet to be determined,” the claim said.

Why should the school be held responsible? asks Jazz Shaw on Hot Air.

The lawsuit claims the children were not protected from “foreseeable harm” because officials had failed to provide a “safe school setting” or design “an effective student safety emergency response plan and protocol.”

Sandy Hook Elementary’s doors were locked, writes Doug Mataconis, a lawyer, on Outside the Beltway. Adam Lanza shot his way in.

. . . teachers and aides did everything they could to evacuate the building or get the children into areas where they’d be hidden and safe. One teacher lost her life protecting her children from Lanza’s murderous spree. What, exactly, is it that this family asserts the school could have reasonably done differently? Perhaps they need to count their blessings, be glad their child is safe, and stop looking for a pot of gold out of this horrible tragedy.

I agree. Sandy Hook had a reasonable level of security for an elementary school — everything but armed guards. We can’t foresee and prevent every possible horror.

Here are the names of Adam Lanza’s victims.

Heroes

When an elementary school became a combat zone, Newtown’s teachers were heroes, reports CNN.

When Adam Lanza shot his way into Sandy Hook Elementary School, Principal Dawn Hochsprung ran toward the gun shots with school psychologist Mary Sherlach and Vice Principal Natalie Hammond. Hochsprung, 47, and Sherlach, 56, were killed.

Four teachers were killed with their students.

Victoria Soto, 27, moved her first-grade students away from the classroom door. The gunman burst in and shot her, according to the father of a surviving student.

“She would not hesitate to think to save anyone else before herself and especially children,” her mother, Donna Soto, told CNN’s Piers Morgan.

Anne Marie Murphy’s body was found in a classroom, slumped over young children killed in the shooting. The 52-year-old special education teacher was apparently attempting to shield them, her father told the newspaper Newsday.

Rachel D’Avino, 29, was a behavioral therapist who worked with autistic children. D’Avino’s boyfriend was going to propose to her on Christmas Eve.

Lauren Rousseau, 30, had dreamed of being a teacher since before she went to kindergarten herself. She had only been hired last month by Sandy Hook and was substituting for a teacher on maternity leave, when Lanza killed her.

Kindergarten teacher Janet Vollmer locked her classroom door when the shots rang out. She took the children into a nook between bookcases and a wall and read them a story to keep them calm. ”We’re going to be safe,” Vollmer told them, “because we’re sitting over here and we’re all together.”

I tutor first graders in reading at a California elementary school. There’s no way to bar entrance to outsiders:  Every classroom door opens to the outside. I only know a few teachers there and a few aides, but I’d bet they’d stand between a gunmen and their kids. I’ll be back there Wednesday.

Chicago: Help the 'most likely to be shot'

In response to 37 student shootings in the past school year, Chicago Public Schools have identified 1,200 high school students most likely to get shot and set up a $30 million program to keep them out of trouble, reports the Chicago Sun-Times.  In the last five years, high school shooting victims have tended to be “black males, homeless, special education students and students at alternative schools,” says Ron Huberman, the district CEO.

Such kids also tended to be at least two credits behind in high school, to have been absent for more than 40 percent of the school year and to have committed nearly one serious school violation per school year.

Potential shooting victims will be matched with “advocates” and social workers “who will work with the students, their families, their schools and their communities in pinpointing and addressing their problems,” Huberman said. All will be offered paid jobs to keep them busy.

These are kids with serious behavioral and academic problems. They cut school more than 40 percent of the time!  It seems odd to frame the problem in terms of violence. A few will be shooters and a few will be shot, but all of these kids — and their friends who cut “only” 20 percent of the time — are doomed to failure. If they can be helped by social workers and counselors, they need that help to start in kindergarten and first grade.

I also have problems with giving paid jobs to chronic truants.  What does that say to the kids who show up every day? No bribes for you unless you commit “one serious school violation” per year.

Via Flypaper.