Teacher charged with discussing ham

In Cadiz, Spain, a Muslim student charged his geography teacher with xenophobia and racism for discussing ham, reports Pajamas Media.  The teacher, a 20-year veteran, had mentioned that the cold mountain climate of the Granada town of Trevélez is conducive to curing ham.

The students’ parents filed a police complaint; the local prosecutor doesn’t plan to press charges.

Mohamed Ali, president of the Spanish Federation of Islamic Religious Entities, called the student’s complaint “absolutely ridiculous,” saying the “Koran prohibits the consumption of ham, not the discussion of it.”

My Spanish isn’t too good, but I think the teacher also called the ham complaint ridiculous and grotesque.

ACLU sues ‘Muslim’ charter school

Calling it a “pervasively Muslim school,” the ACLU has filed suit against Tarek ibn Ziyad Academy, a public charter school in Minnesota that shares space with the Muslim American Society of Minnesota.

TiZA, founded in 2003, teaches 430 K-8 students. Although most students come  from low-income immigrant families — many are African — test scores are higher than the state average.

The lawsuit contends TiZA endorses Muslim religious practices by:

# Permitting prayer sessions during school hours and having teacher-sanctioned religious material posted on classroom bulletin boards.

# Allowing students and teachers to gather for 30 minutes of communal prayer every Friday.

# Giving preference to Muslim clothing rules. Girls, but not boys, are prohibited from wearing short sleeves. Girls also must wear skirts or pants of a certain length, depending on their grade level. Female teachers must be covered from neck to wrist and ankle.

A state investigation called for running buses for students who don’t wish to stay for the after-school religion classes and holding the Friday prayer service after school. School officials say they’ve complied.

Joe Nathan, director of the University of Minnesota’s Center for School Change, puts TiZA “in the top 5 percent of schools he has reviewed in terms of academic excellence and commitment to tolerance.” As a Jew, Nathan says, he’s strongly committed to the separation of church (or mosque) and state.