Lawyer withdraws Newtown suit — for now

That $100 million lawsuit claiming Connecticut failed to protect Sandy Hook Elementary students has been withdrawn, but could be refiled.

“I received new evidence on security at the school, which I need to evaluate,” (lawyer Irving) Pinsky said Monday.

The suit was filed in the name of “Jill Doe,” a six-year-old girl who survived the massacre but allegedly was traumatized by hearing screams, cursing and gunshots on the intercom. Pinsky said the suit’s goal was to improve school safety, not to make money. Of course.

The Sandy Hook lawsuits begin

Twenty children and six adults were gunned down at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Now the parents of a 6-year-old survivor are suing the school for $100 million because their child heard “cursing, screaming, and shooting” over the school intercom. “As a consequence, the … child has sustained emotional and psychological trauma and injury, the nature and extent of which are yet to be determined,” the claim said.

Why should the school be held responsible? asks Jazz Shaw on Hot Air.

The lawsuit claims the children were not protected from “foreseeable harm” because officials had failed to provide a “safe school setting” or design “an effective student safety emergency response plan and protocol.”

Sandy Hook Elementary’s doors were locked, writes Doug Mataconis, a lawyer, on Outside the Beltway. Adam Lanza shot his way in.

. . . teachers and aides did everything they could to evacuate the building or get the children into areas where they’d be hidden and safe. One teacher lost her life protecting her children from Lanza’s murderous spree. What, exactly, is it that this family asserts the school could have reasonably done differently? Perhaps they need to count their blessings, be glad their child is safe, and stop looking for a pot of gold out of this horrible tragedy.

I agree. Sandy Hook had a reasonable level of security for an elementary school — everything but armed guards. We can’t foresee and prevent every possible horror.

Here are the names of Adam Lanza’s victims.

Cheater’s parents sue school

Caught copying another student’s homework, a California sophomore was kicked out of honors English. His parents admit he cheated, violating the Academic Honesty Pledge he’d signed at the start of the year. But the cheater’s parents are suing, claiming the teen’s due process rights were violated, reports the San Jose Mercury News. The boy’s father, Jack Berghouse, said the punishment is too severe and could make it harder for his son to get into a top college.

The school offered to let the boy enter the International Baccalaureate program in 11th and 12th grade with others in the honors track and to keep the cheating incident off his transcript. But that wasn’t enough for the parents.

In a Mercury News poll, 84 percent of readers said cheaters shouldn’t get a second chance. Berghouse complains he’s “getting a lot of hate calls” about the lawsuit at his office.

One of my daughter’s high school classmates got away with plagiarizing homework in an honors class, but was rejected by every college that required a teacher’s recommendation letter.  He transferred to an elite college — and was expelled for cheating.

$610,000 settles spycam case

Two students photographed in their bedrooms by their school-issued laptops have settled with the Lower Merion School District in suburban Philadelphia. The district will pay $610,000, Wired reports. One student gets $175,000, the other gets $10,000 and the rest goes their lawyers.

 School officians say the webcams were activated only if a computer was reported lost or stolen. The 6,900-pupil district lends free MacBooks to high school students.

The original suit was based on a claim by (Blake) Robbins, a sophomore at the time, that school officials reprimanded him for “improper behavior” based on photos the computer secretly took of the boy at home last fall. One picture shows him asleep at home last October.

That “behavior” turned out to be pill popping. The family said their son was eating Mike and Ike candy, his lawyer claimed.

The district says its insurance will pay the full cost of the litigation.  Prosecutors announced two months ago that no criminal charges will be filed.

Jobless graduate sues college

Despite earning an information technology degree in April, Trina Thompson hasn’t found a job. So she’s suing her alma mater, Monroe College, for $70,000 in tuition, reports the New York Post.

The 27-year-old alleges the business-oriented Bronx school hasn’t lived up to its end of the bargain, and has not done enough to find her a job.

The information-technology student blames Monroe’s Office of Career Advancement for not providing her with the leads and career advice it promised.

It’s only been a few months, which isn’t much to be job hunting in a recession. And I have a feeling Monroe doesn’t offer a money-back guarantee.