Obama, Romney vie for Hispanic college students

In an appeal to Hispanic voters, President Obama’s new campaign ad says Romney would cut Pell Grants, costing Hispanic students $1,000. In an interview with Univision, a Spanish-language network, the Republican challenger called for letting the maximum grant rise with inflation, a larger increase than the president’s proposed 1.5 percent boost.

Both candidates are running Spanish-language ads attacking the rise in college costs. Obama’s ad promises to decrease the  tuition growth rate by 50 percent over 10 years.

At the Univision event at the University of Miami, Romney told students that what they need is “good jobs,” not more loans. “I don’t want to overwhelm you with debts. I want to make sure you can pay back the debts you’ve already got and that will happen with good jobs.”

Learn more, earn more

People who learn more, earn more. However, the rate of return is high on associate degrees because community college tuition is so low.

With no degree, recession hits hard

The job market’s tough for new college graduates — and even tougher for would-be workers with only a high school diploma.

Jobless graduates

Here’s grim news for Labor Day: Only 64% of 2011 and 2012 graduates have a job of any kind and most working grads aren’t in jobs that require a degree, according to a survey by the Wall Street Journal‘s Market Watch.

College students are competing for jobs with older workers who haven’t been able to move up or afford to retire.

Another survey out of Rutgers found that about half of college graduates are finding themselves working in a job that doesn’t require any of the skills they obtained in the course of their studies. Only 1/5th actually managed to get that fit their major in a relevant way. Most find themselves in a paid position that wouldn’t have required a four-year degree to obtain, causing some survey takers to think that the the time and money invested in the higher education might have been a waste.

Via Education News.

College graduates should not have to live out their 20s in their childhood bedrooms, staring up at fading Obama posters and wondering when they can move out and get going with life,” Paul Ryan said in accepting the Republican vice presidential nomination.

Already a GOP PAC has an ad up:

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Study: 2-year for-profit students earn more

Associate degree students at for-profit colleges raise their earnings as much as community college students — or more — concludes a new study. Students who choose the more costly for-profit option are nearly twice as likely to earn a degree as community college students, even though the for-profit students are more likely to be poor, black, single parents and GED holders.

Britain: More degrees are worth less

College –and debt — for all isn’t just a U.S. thing. Students must be told the whole truth about the value of a college degree, writes Fraser Nelson in Britain’s Telegraph.

To listen to ministers talk about university education, it is as if Britain has entered an academic arms race with the rest of the world. China’s universities, we’re told, are spewing out six million graduates a year: we must compete, or we’re doomed. In the Blair years, a national target was set: half of all young people ought to enter higher education. They’d have to get into debt, but they were reassured it would be a worthwhile investment.

The real picture is more complex, Nelson argues. “In many lines of work, those who did not get the A-levels for university now have a future just as bright (or otherwise) as the graduates.”

Students are told they’ll earn much more with a degree — but a degree in what? Golf Management? Trade  Union Studies? The college premium diminishes for students with less rigorous degrees, especially for men. Humanities graduates also fare poorly, according to a recent government report, Nelson writes.

Those who graduate in the subjects I studied, history and philosophy, can expect to earn a paltry £35 a year more than non-graduates. For graduates in “mass communication” the premium is just £120 a year. But both are better value than a degree in “creative arts”, where graduates can actually expect to earn £15,000 less, over a lifetime, than those who start work aged 18.

Almost a third of recent college graduates are in jobs that don’t require higher education and one in 10 is “on the dole.”

Youth survey: 96% say they make their own success

“If you’ve got a business — you didn’t build that,” said President Obama at a campaign stop in Virginia. “Somebody else made that happen.”

Young people think they’ll be the authors of their own success, according to the Horatio Alger Association’s 2012-2013 State of Our Nation’s Youth survey: 96 percent of high school students and graduates agree that their own actions, rather than luck, shape their ability to succeed. Most expect to work in the private sector and/or be self-employed.

Those surveyed, ages 14 to 23, were not much interested in presidential politics. Only 57 percent of high school students said they cared who wins the election, down from 75 percent in 2008. Graduates and students were much more concerned about the economy and jobs compared to 2008. That’s not surprising: 39 percent of high school students and 28 percent of graduates not in college can’t find work.

Other results:

48 percent of high school students get news online.  Just 15 percent read printed news.

63 percent of high school students are taking college preparatory classes, but 24 percent of recent grads who took college prep needed remedial education classes to meet college requirements.

37 percent of high school students reported receiving mostly A’s, up from 25 percent in 2008.

97 percent of students aspire to further education after high school, up from 93 percent in 2008.

Despite everything, 60 percent of high school students are hopeful about the country’s future compared to 53 percent in 2008.

No math, no job

High-tech manufacturers are hiring, but many job applicants don’t have required math skills.

North American Tool Corp.’s Jim Hoyt has two openings right now . . .

“I’ll write a few numbers down, mostly numbers with decimal points, because that’s what we use in manufacturing, and have them add them or subtract them, or divide by two,” Hoyt says. Job applicants often can’t do the math.

Manufacturers are “growing our own” workers using a system of “stackable” credentials.

More degrees — and more educated waiters

More young Americans hold a college degree of some kind, reports the Census. Some 39.3 percent of 25- to 34-year-olds are degreed. President Obama’s goal for 2020 is 60 percent.

However more college graduates are underemployed, competing with less-educated young people for low-paying service jobs.  The number of waiters and waitresses ages 18 to 30 with college degrees increased 81 percent from 2000 to 2010, reports the Census, while college-educated bartenders, dishwashers and file clerks in that age group doubled.

 

‘College for all’ spurs backlash

As debt-laden college graduates wait tables, mix drinks and push brooms, the backlash against the “college for all’ idea is growing. But defenders, led by President Obama, say they never wanted everyone to go for a bachelor’s degree.

Also on Community College Spotlight: Human sexuality students at Western Nevada College are required to masturbate, keep sex journals and write a term paper on their sexual histories, according to a federal lawsuit filed by a former student who charged invasion of privacy and sexual harassment.