Student aid funds most job training

Most federal support for job training flows through college aid, not workforce development programs.

Vets choose for-profits over public options

Thirty-one percent of military veterans enrolled in for-profit colleges in 2012, up from 23 percent three years earlier. Only 50 percent chose public colleges, down from 62 percent.

Critics blame aggressive marketing, but vets could be choosing more focused job-training programs.

Feds will fund adult ed, job training mix

The new workforce bill will make it easier for community colleges to teach basic skills and job skills at the same time. Federal rules have required high school dropouts to catch up academically before starting job training.

Obama signs job training bill

President Obama signed the bipartisan workforce training bill and said federally funded training programs will have to make public how many of their graduates find jobs and how much they are paid. That’s been the law for years, but the Labor Department has granted a lot of waivers.

This way up

A bachelor’s degree isn’t the only route to the middle class, but the upwardly mobile need “easy on-ramps, goal-oriented job training and a series of ascending steps, with industry-certified credentials to guide the way.”

‘College for all’ includes job training

College is the path to a good job, but that includes going to community college to train for skilled blue-collar jobs that offer a path to the middle class.

Skilled workers draw skilled jobs

Long known for poverty and bad schools, Eastern Mississippi’s “Golden Triangle” is drawing “high-wage, high-skill jobs” thanks to job training programs at the local community college.

Corinthian crashes

Under investigation for falsifying job placement rates, for-profit Corinthian Colleges will sell 85 campuses and close 12 others. The national company runs Everest, WyoTech and Heald career colleges.

An open door to debt?

Community colleges provide easy access — to failure and debt, argues a new book by remedial English instructors. Poorly prepared students have little hope of success, they write. Raising admissions requirements would strengthen academic classes for prepared students and redirect the unprepared to short-term job training that might help them improve their lives.

Who completes college

Graduation rates vary by type of college, because different colleges recruit different types of students. Pew Research looks at how students are doing six years after enrolling in college.

The for-profit colleges enroll older, less-capable students who are much less likely to complete an academic degree, but much more likely to complete a two-year-or-less vocational credential. Community colleges, which also enroll many high-risk students, offer low-success academic programs and higher-success job training.
CollegeGrads_1