Rosetta Stone replaces teachers in Maine

Unable to find a French and Spanish teacher, a Maine high school will use Rosetta Stone software to teach foreign languages, reports Rachel Ohm in the Morning Sentinel. An educational technician will help students with the software.

In Madison, a small town in central Maine, 67 out of 215 high school students take French or Spanish.

Rosetta Stone is used in more than 4,000 schools nationwide, though usually to supplement rather than replace a human teacher, reports Ohm.

Paige Wong, 17, is learning Spanish via Rosetta Stone at Madison High in Maine. Photo: Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel

Paige Wong, 17, is learning Spanish via Rosetta Stone at Madison High in Maine. Photo: Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel

Students can work at their own pace, though they’re expected to finish one language level by the end of the year.

The program quizzes students and repeats lessons if they haven’t achieved mastery.

“In a regular classroom, that wouldn’t happen,” (aide Nicholas) Paradis said. “The teacher would say, ‘OK, you got an 80. You’re good forever. Bye.’ Instead, everyone that got an 80 now has to come back and take the quiz again.”

The program teaches 30 languages. Ninth grader Aidan O’Donnell decided to take German, which the school hasn’t offered before.

Madison High will try to hire a foreign language teacher next year, even if Rosetta Stone is a success, said Principal Jessica Ward. “Yes, they are learning the language with the Rosetta Stone program, but I worry that they are missing out on the cultural education and the personal touch of having a real teacher available.”

Via Education Week Teacher.

Technolgy won’t replace teachers, writes Thomas Arnett on the Christensen blog.

The truth is, in the era of artificial intelligence, the most valued and secure jobs will be those that require complex social skills—such as teaching. Good teachers do more than just convey information. They coach and mentor their students to make learning relevant and meaningful, and they foster students’ interests in tackling complex, real-world problems. And while technology can replicate teachers’ expertise in dispensing information and assessing students’ knowledge of rote facts and skills, it is far from replacing the teacher’s role in providing expert feedback on critical thinking, communication, and leadership.

Technology can handle some teaching tasks, he adds. “But the more we utilize the best recorded lectures, documentary films, and instructional technologies to replace live lectures, the more we can free up teachers to spend their time working closely with their students to foster deeper learning.”

Report: Education failure puts U.S. at risk

Educational failure threatens our economic prosperity, global leadership and national security, according to a report by a Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) task force chaired by Joel I. Klein, former head of New York City public schools, and Condoleezza Rice, former U.S. secretary of state.

Too many young people are not employable in an increasingly high-skilled and global economy, and too many are not qualified to join the military because they are physically unfit, have criminal records, or have an inadequate level of education.

“Human capital will determine power in the current century, and the failure to produce that capital will undermine America’s security,” the report states. “Large, undereducated swaths of the population damage the ability of the United States to physically defend itself, protect its secure information, conduct diplomacy, and grow its economy.”

Among other policy suggestions, the report calls for expanding Common Core Standards to include “the skills and knowledge necessary to safeguard the country’s national security,” including science, technology, foreign languages, creative problem-solving skills and civic awareness.

Update:  History, science and art are “truant” from school, said panelists at a  Common Core discussion. Common Core will be creating Common Core State Standards-based curriculum maps in history and geography. David Coleman, one of the lead writers of the new English Language Arts standards, said it’s impossible to teach K-5 reading “without coherently developing knowledge in science, and history, and the arts.”

 And that is why NAEP scores in early grades can improve slightly but collapse as students grow older. Because it is the deep foundation in rich knowledge and vocabulary depth that allows you to access more complex text.

Let’s not get confused here that [the CCSS] are adding back nice things [history, arts, science] that are an addendum to literacy.  We are adding the cornerstones of literacy, which are the foundations of knowledge, that make literacy happen.

There is no greater threat to literary study in this country than false imitations of  literature which do not deserve to be read.

Coleman told states not buy mediocre materials with a “Common Core” stamp.  Wait for the good stuff to be available, he said.

Schools drop foreign languages

Short of funding, elementary and middle schools are dropping foreign language study, reports the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel.

From 1997 to 2008, the share of all U.S. elementary schools offering language classes fell from 31% to 25%, while middle schools dropped from 75% to 58%. High school language instruction was static, according to the nationwide survey published this year by the Center for Applied Linguistics in Washington, D.C.

The central Wisconsin village of Marathon City cut Chinese-language classes this year, after five years of offering the language. Why Chinese? Marathon City grows ginseng, used in Chinese herbal medicine. China is a major customer.

“In a world of global trade, a second language can be a surefire ticket to a career,” reporter John Schmid asserts.

Really?

Much of Europe and Asia, by contrast, make second and third languages compulsory, beginning early in grade school, according to Center for Applied Linguistics researcher Nancy Rhodes, who wrote the report on behalf of the U.S. Department of Education.

“They will all become multilingual students of the world, while U.S. students plod along,” Rhodes said. “We’ll be left in the dust and unable to communicate with people around the world.”

Chinese grade-schoolers start learning English by third grade under a national law that supports Beijing’s export ambitions – which means China is producing English speakers by the hundreds of millions.

We’ll be able to communicate: They’re all learning English! It’s the language of trade. When the Chinese stop teaching English, we’re doomed.