Common Core no more

As Common Core controversy mounts, several states are renaming the education standards, reports Fox News.

Common Core is now  “The Iowa Core” in the Hawkeye State. In Florida, it’s “Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.”

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer signed an executive order to erase the name “Common Core.” Instead, officials will refer to “Arizona’s College and Career Ready Standards.’’

Other states may follow suit. “We will probably do something really silly like changing the name of it to something else”to confuse opponents, said Louisiana Rep. Walt Leger, D-New Orleans.

Charter grads go farther, earn more

Charter high school students go farther in school and earn more as adults, concludes a Mathematica study. Researchers followed Florida and Chicago charter eighth graders for 11 years, comparing those who attended a charter high school and classmates who went to a traditional high school.

Charter students don’t earn higher test scores, on average, unless they attend “no excuses” charters, previous research has found. However, they’re significantly more likely than similar students to complete high school and enroll in college. 

. . . students attending Chicago and Florida charter high schools were 7 to 15 percentage points more likely to graduate and 8 to 10 percentage points more likely to enroll in college than comparison groups of students who attended charter middle schools but matriculated to traditional public high schools.

The former charter high students earned more at age 25 than the control group, Mathematica found. That suggests charter high schools “are endowing students with skills, knowledge, work habits, motivation, and values that are important for long-term success but are not fully captured by test scores.”

Florida’s low-cost degrees pay off

Academics sneer at cut-rate college degrees, but Florida’s low-cost degrees pay off for graduates. The Florida College System (formerly the community college system) offers workforce-oriented bachelor’s degrees that cost $13,000 or less.  Graduates earn $8,000 more in their first year after graduation than state university graduates.

NCTQ: States get C- for teacher policies

The National Council on Teacher Quality has released its 2013 State Teacher Policy Yearbook. The national average was a C-, up from D+ in 2011 and D in 2009.

Florida earned the highest overall teacher policy grade in the nation, a B+. Louisiana, Rhode Island and Tennessee earned Bs, and 10 other states earned B-.  . . . Montana has consistently earned an F in the Yearbook for its record of inaction. Alaska, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Vermont and Wyoming earned Ds or lower.

Here’s NCTQ’s new state policy web site.

Schools get D+ from Students First

The nation’s schools earn a D+  from Michelle Rhee’s Students First. No state earned an A, reports U.S. News.

The group evaluated states on three policy areas: how well states “attract, retain and recognize quality teachers,” how well they give parents easily accessible information about their children’s schools and how well they spend public funds to support schools and teachers.

Louisiana (B-) and Florida (B-) earned the highest grades, followed by Indiana (C+). North Dakota, Montana and Vermont received F’s.

Fourteen states now assign A-F letter grades to schools or will do so by 2015, reports the Education Commission of the States’ new accountability database.

? All 50 states and the District of Columbia consider student achievement as measured by test results in their performance indicators
? 37 states and D.C. factor in student growth or improvement on tests in deciding school performance. That’s up from 21 in 2002.
? 44 states and D.C. consider graduation rates in determining school performance while 12 states include dropout rates.
? 9 states weigh growth of the lowest-performing quartile of students in judging their schools.

Florida was the first state to issue letter grades to schools in 2002.

Floridians prepay for community college

Florida parents are prepaying community college tuition to lock in lower prices. Prices have soared for four-year university plans offered by the Florida Prepaid College Program. And many of the state’s community colleges now offer bachelor’s degrees in vocational fields.

Remedial remake

High failure rates in remedial math have prompted Illinois community college teachers to develop “math literacy” courses for students in non-STEM majors.

A remedial revolution will hit Florida next fall: Most state college students will not be required to take remedial courses, regardless of their college readiness.

“Accelerated” remediation is getting more community college students to college-level math and English in California.

Texas, Florida drop college-prep-for-all

Texas won’t require all high school graduates to pass Algebra II, reports the Texas Tribune. Of five new diplomas, only the honors and STEM diplomas will require advanced algebra. The school board feared struggling students would drop out if they saw no realistic pat to a diploma.

Only half of the state’s high school graduates go directly to college, writes Sophie Quinton

Rather than a recommended four years each of math, science, and social studies, Texas students now need just three credits in each and must take five end-of-course tests rather than 15. Students will be able to earn “endorsements” in areas such as public service, arts and humanities, and business and industry. The State Board of Education is currently debating which endorsements will require Algebra 2.

Florida is rolling back college-prep-for-all requirements passed in 2010, writes Quinton.  Students who take Algebra 2 and either chemistry or physics will earn a “scholar” diploma, while those who earn one or more industry certifications will earn a “merit” designation.

Sixteen other states have made Algebra II a graduation requirement, she writes. So far, they’re staying the course.

Once a state has multiple high school diplomas, it makes a lot of sense to create a college-prep diploma, a vocational-prep diploma and a basic diploma for those with minimal skills. People worry that fewer disadvantaged students will go to college. I think more will earn a degree if they’ve chosen the academic track. And those who choose the technical/vocational track will have a decent shot at success.

More kids, more elders

“The United States faces a staggering demographic challenge over the next two decades,” writes Matthew Ladner on redefinED.

It will hit first in Florida. “The state will need to find a way to educate far more than one million additional students each year by 2030.” At the same time, Florida’s elderly population will more than double between 2010 and 2030, from 3.4 million to almost 7.8 million people 65 and older.

Building more schools and providing more care for the elderly will put a heavy burden on working-age Floridians.

Teacher evaluation is a-changin’

Most states are using student achievement to evaluate teachers, according to Connect the Dots from the National Council on Teacher Quality. “What is occurring more slowly are the policy changes that will connect the rich performance data from these systems to tenure decisions, professional development, compensation, teacher preparation, and consequences for ineffectiveness.”

NCTQ looks at teacher evaluation policies across the 50 states and Washington D.C. Louisiana is “connecting the most dots,” followed closely by Florida and Tennessee, NCTQ concludes. Colorado, Delaware, Illinois, Michigan, Rhode Island and DCPS are also ahead of the curve.