Common Core will make your kids gay!

Common Core hysteria has hit a new high — or maybe a low. Florida’s Common Core testing company, American Institutes for Research, is trying to “attract every one of your children to become as homosexual as they possibly can,” charged Rep. Charles Van Zant at an anti-Core conference.

Later, he repeated that AIR is“supportive” of gay agenda reports Think Progress. In addition to its education work, AIR researches ways to help lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and “two-spirit” youth, the Republican legislator complains.

$10K degree isn’t impossible after all

When Texas Gov. Rick Perry challenged public universities to craft four-year degrees costing no more than $10,000, many said it was impossible. Three years later, 12 Texas universities have announced $10,000 bachelor’s degrees and the idea has spread to Florida, Oklahoma and Oregon.

Core English in action

At a Florida middle school, the Common Core doesn’t just mean new standards, educators believe. It calls for”a package of teaching techniques – such as students working in small and large groups,” writes John O’Connor on the Hechinger Report.

Dawn Norris plans lessons for her sixth graders, but has given up some control. “It’s up to students to question, challenge and prod each other toward the goal written on the classroom whiteboard.”
A classroom chart explaining the differences between claims, claim evidence and commentary. Hillsborough County schools are teaching the Three Cs as the building blocks of student writing. (Photo: John O'Connor)
Norris breaks the students into groups to write about how different cultures tell the same fairy story.

Two girls discuss Chinye, a West African version of Cinderella.

“And that’s your claim, which is your topic sentence,” one boy tells another. “This is your thesis, the central claim.”

“Supporting ideas with evidence from a text is a central pillar of the Common Core language arts standards,” writes O’Connor.

“In Christina Phillips’ sixth-grade classroom, students learn about the “three C’s – claim, claim evidence and commentary.”

“This pig made his house of bricks,” reads Phillips. “Is that factual evidence from the text? Or is that my opinion?”

“That’s evidence!” a student says.

Ready or not, here they come

Ready or not, most  Florida college students are skipping remedial classes under a new state law that lets unprepared students start at the college level, if they wish.

Algebra II or welding?

 States are dropping college-prep-for-all requirements  in a school standards rebellion, writes Stephanie Simon on Politico

Florida students no longer need chemistry, physics or Algebra II to graduate from high school. Texas just scrapped its Algebra II requirement. And Washington state has dropped its foreign language mandate.

. . . They’re letting teens study welding instead of Spanish, take greenhouse management in place of physics and learn car repair instead of muddling over imaginary numbers.

The college-for-all idea is elitist, say career-tech proponents. With rising college debt and more film studies graduates working as bartenders, there’s growing interest in “middle skill” technical jobs. 

President Obama and Education Secretary Arne Duncan have been talking up vocational education recently, but they want all students to have college-level skills, writes Simon. “Especially worrisome” is “the risk that low-income and minority students, as well as children with disabilities, could be pushed into the vocational tracks.”

New Mexico state Rep. Mimi Stewart, a Democrat, has introduced a bill to drop the Algebra II graduation requirement. “We are supposed to be doing college and career readiness, not college and college readiness,” Stewart said.

Indiana State Rep. Wendy McNamara, a Republican, wants to design a vocational diploma with input from local employers.

College prep has crowded out vocational options, argue The Jobs for Texas Coalition. “For 20 years, we’ve been ratcheting up the rigor required to get out of high school, and we started to see unintended consequences,” said Mike Meroney, a spokesman for the coalition.

Letting kids opt out of college prep doesn’t mean they’ll spend a lifetime flipping burgers, Meroney said. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics lists two dozen fast-growing occupations that don’t require higher education and pay $35,000 to $55,000 a year, including heavy equipment operator and car mechanic. “What is the real purpose of education if not to prepare your students for jobs?” Meroney said. “Seriously. That’s what we keep asking.”

While Texas has dropped the Algebra II requirement, Minnesota and Connecticut are phasing in Algebra II mandates, writes Simon. 

New York set new college-ready benchmarks, but won’t expect graduates to be college ready till 2022. Louisiana is aiming for 2025.

Common Core no more

As Common Core controversy mounts, several states are renaming the education standards, reports Fox News.

Common Core is now  “The Iowa Core” in the Hawkeye State. In Florida, it’s “Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.”

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer signed an executive order to erase the name “Common Core.” Instead, officials will refer to “Arizona’s College and Career Ready Standards.’’

Other states may follow suit. “We will probably do something really silly like changing the name of it to something else”to confuse opponents, said Louisiana Rep. Walt Leger, D-New Orleans.

Charter grads go farther, earn more

Charter high school students go farther in school and earn more as adults, concludes a Mathematica study. Researchers followed Florida and Chicago charter eighth graders for 11 years, comparing those who attended a charter high school and classmates who went to a traditional high school.

Charter students don’t earn higher test scores, on average, unless they attend “no excuses” charters, previous research has found. However, they’re significantly more likely than similar students to complete high school and enroll in college. 

. . . students attending Chicago and Florida charter high schools were 7 to 15 percentage points more likely to graduate and 8 to 10 percentage points more likely to enroll in college than comparison groups of students who attended charter middle schools but matriculated to traditional public high schools.

The former charter high students earned more at age 25 than the control group, Mathematica found. That suggests charter high schools “are endowing students with skills, knowledge, work habits, motivation, and values that are important for long-term success but are not fully captured by test scores.”

Florida’s low-cost degrees pay off

Academics sneer at cut-rate college degrees, but Florida’s low-cost degrees pay off for graduates. The Florida College System (formerly the community college system) offers workforce-oriented bachelor’s degrees that cost $13,000 or less.  Graduates earn $8,000 more in their first year after graduation than state university graduates.

NCTQ: States get C- for teacher policies

The National Council on Teacher Quality has released its 2013 State Teacher Policy Yearbook. The national average was a C-, up from D+ in 2011 and D in 2009.

Florida earned the highest overall teacher policy grade in the nation, a B+. Louisiana, Rhode Island and Tennessee earned Bs, and 10 other states earned B-.  . . . Montana has consistently earned an F in the Yearbook for its record of inaction. Alaska, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Vermont and Wyoming earned Ds or lower.

Here’s NCTQ’s new state policy web site.

Schools get D+ from Students First

The nation’s schools earn a D+  from Michelle Rhee’s Students First. No state earned an A, reports U.S. News.

The group evaluated states on three policy areas: how well states “attract, retain and recognize quality teachers,” how well they give parents easily accessible information about their children’s schools and how well they spend public funds to support schools and teachers.

Louisiana (B-) and Florida (B-) earned the highest grades, followed by Indiana (C+). North Dakota, Montana and Vermont received F’s.

Fourteen states now assign A-F letter grades to schools or will do so by 2015, reports the Education Commission of the States’ new accountability database.

? All 50 states and the District of Columbia consider student achievement as measured by test results in their performance indicators
? 37 states and D.C. factor in student growth or improvement on tests in deciding school performance. That’s up from 21 in 2002.
? 44 states and D.C. consider graduation rates in determining school performance while 12 states include dropout rates.
? 9 states weigh growth of the lowest-performing quartile of students in judging their schools.

Florida was the first state to issue letter grades to schools in 2002.