Employers ask for old SAT scores

“Plenty of employers” ask job candidates about their SAT scores, reports the Wall Street Journal.

Consulting firms such as Bain & Co. and McKinsey & Co. and banks like Goldman Sachs Group Inc. ask new college recruits for their scores, while other companies request them even for senior sales and management hires, eliciting scores from job candidates in their 40s and 50s.

College Board keeps SAT scores on file forever, so lying is risky.

Some companies are reluctant to hire people who’ve scored below the 95th percentile in math.

However, Google, which used to look closely at “grade-point averages, test scores and alma mater,” has changed tactics, reports the Journal. Internal studies found “very little correlation between SAT scores and job performance,” said Kyle Ewing, head of global staffing. Google now puts more stress on “interview questions that probe how a potential hire has solved complex problems,” reports the Journal.

Enrollment dips as jobs rebound

Community college enrollment, which boomed during the height of the recession, is down across the country.

Higher education productivity is declining: We’re spending a lot more and sending a lot more high school graduates to college, but not getting as much brains (well, degrees) for the bucks.

Teaching entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurship should be “a general education outcome” for community college students, “like effective writing or quantitative reasoning,” some argue. “Better to train students to hang out their own shingles than to train them for jobs that no longer exist,” they believe. 

Every Major’s Terrible

Every Major’s Terrible:

Post-college tests could help job seekers

Post-college tests, such as the CLA+, could help non-elite college graduates prove their competence to potential employers.  Grade inflation has eroded the signaling value of a college degree.

College pays — $11

30-Year-Old Has Earned $11 More Than He Would Have Without College Education headlines The Onion. It’s a parody that’s all too close to reality.

“After accounting for the cost of tuition, four years of lost earning potential, and the minimal increase in salary an undergraduate degree provides,” 30-year-old Patrick Moorhouse of Dublin, Ohio has raised his earnings by $11, reports The Onion. Moorhouse’s more prestigious first-choice college would have led to $54 more in earnings, said researcher Ken Overton.

“If Patrick had started working straight out of high school, he would have had slightly fewer job options than he does now, but living at home instead of a dorm or student apartment even just those first two years would have added at least $16,000 in total savings, which pretty much evens things out.”

However, it’s impossible to “put a price on the 12 Post-WWII European History lectures Moorhouse attended junior year,” the study noted.

I-BEST: Job training that works

If adults have to master basic skills before they start job training, most won’t make it. In Washington state, they can do both at the same time. Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training, known as I-BEST, is getting adult students into the workforce quickly.

The Obama administration has proposed new gainful employment regulations that try to ensure career programs don’t leave students jobless and in debt.

Left behind

Employers: Grads aren’t prepared for work

Most employers say college graduates aren’t prepared for work, reports a new survey. College students tend to be overconfident about their readiness.

“College for all” — or even job training for all — won’t revive the economy, argues a new book. We don’t lack skilled workers. We lack skilled jobs.

4 in 10 grads don’t need college degree at work

Four in 10 college graduates don’t need a degree to do their job.