You don’t need a BA to work at McDonald’s

Job seekers don’t need a bachelor’s degree and experience to work at McDonald’s, reports the Boston Globe.

An independent job search site inaccurately claimed the McDonald’s in Winchendon, Massachusetts was looking for college graduates with one to two years of experience to work as cashiers.

McD’s ad seeks 4-year degree for cashier job

McDonald’s cashiers need a bachelor’s degree and one to two years of experience, according to a want ad for a McDonald’s in Winchedon, Massachusetts. ”Get a weekly paycheck with a side order of food, folks and fun,” says the ad.

Degree inflation gone wild or a cruel joke? It’s hard to say.

“Permaterns” — permanent interns — are working for low and no pay through their 20s and sometimes into their 30s, reports The Week.  “For many in Washington, the American dream starts with a highbrow internship that pays $4.35 an hour — then another, and maybe another.”  Graduates with poli sci degrees are a dime a dozen — or less.

It takes a degree to be a file clerk

“The college degree is becoming the new high school diploma: the new minimum requirement, albeit an expensive one, for getting even the lowest-level job,” reports the New York Times.

At an Atlanta law firm, all the support staff are four-year graduates from paralegals, admins and file clerks to the $10-an-hour courier.

“College graduates are just more career-oriented,” said Adam Slipakoff, the firm’s managing partner. “Going to college means they are making a real commitment to their futures. They’re not just looking for a paycheck.”

Maybe they’re looking for a miracle. The law firm’s receptionist, who earns $37,000 a year, graduated from the Art Institute of Atlanta in 2011 with a degree in fashion and retail management. “I am over $100,000 in student loan debt right now,” said Megan Parker.

“Degree inflation” is increasing, reports the Times. Many “jobs that didn’t used to require a diploma — positions like dental hygienists, cargo agents, clerks and claims adjusters — are increasingly requiring one,” according to Burning Glass, a company that analyzes job ads.

Requiring a bachelor’s degree is a handy way to cut down on the huge pile of applications for every job, a recruiter tells the Times.