‘My Little Pony’ bag is ‘bullying trigger’

Grayson Bruce, 9, can’t take his My Little Pony lunch bag to school because school officials say it’s a “trigger for bullying.”

Bullies who think My Little Pony is for girls are “punching me, pushing me down, calling me horrible names, stuff that really shouldn’t happen,” the North Carolina boy told WLOS-TV.

Buncombe County Schools gave WLOS a statement that said: “An initial step was taken to immediately address a situation that had created a disruption in the classroom.  Buncombe County Schools takes bullying very seriously, and we will continue to take steps to resolve this issue.”

Defender of gay student won’t be expelled

life lesson: what's right and what's permitted doesn't always matchA Florida high school student was suspended, but not expelled, for defending a gay classmate who was being attacked in the cafeteria.

Mark Betterson’s 10-day suspension was reduced to two days after a disciplinary hearing. When James Griffin swung at the football player, he fought back, breaking “zero tolerance” rules. He says he’d do it again, if necessary.

Griffin was arrested for battery for punching Jonathan Colon in the face and head.

“I think it’s a good punishment as substitution for expulsion, but (Betterson) shouldn’t even have been considered for expulsion for what he did,” said sophomore Cody Lesie.

“I think it’s horrible because he got suspended for doing something right,” said sophomore Kyle Piogrim.

No kidding.

Zero tolerance for standing up to bully

When a bully attacked a gay student in the cafeteria, a football player stepped in to protect the victim. Rescuer Mark Betterson was suspended for 10 days for fighting, reports Gay Star News. James Griffin, 18, faces battery charges for the attack on Jonathan Colon, who’s openly gay.

East Lee County High School in Florida has a zero tolerance policy on fighting, reports Reason‘s Hit and Run blog. It doesn’t matter who started it.

Griffin reportedly threw milk in Colon’s face and shouted homophobic slurs before punching him twice in the head. “Jonathan was just going to stand there and get beat up … if I didn’t jump into it,” Betterson told WFTX-TV. “I was just trying to break up the whole thing because its not fair for somebody to get beat up for something that he is.”

Betterson said he had only gotten physical when Griffin had begun throwing punches at him too.

“He swung at me and was like ‘you can get it too’ so we got into a fight,” Betterson said.

” . . to be suspended for 10 days, I don’t understand. I’m not going to stand there and watch somebody get bullied.”

Colon didn’t know Betterson before the fight, he said. “I was protected by someone who had no reason to protect me, we have nothing in common – he’s on the football team and I’m the flamboyant gay boy.” 

Life imitates Glee.

Colon organized classmates to protest Betterson’s suspension, which will be reviewed on Monday.

No-rules play lowers injuries, bullying

A New Zealand school that got rid of playground rules saw a “drop in bullying, serious injuries and vandalism, while concentration levels in class are increasing,” reports TVNZ. 

Chaos may reign at Swanson Primary School with children climbing trees, riding skateboards and playing bullrush during playtime, but surprisingly the students don’t cause bedlam, the principal says.

 “We want kids to be safe and to look after them, but we end up wrapping them in cotton wool when in fact they should be able to fall over,” says Principal Bruce McLachlan.

Swanson School worked with university researchers on encouraging active play, then decided to throw out the rule book. When the study ended, “researchers were amazed by the results,” reports TVNZ.

Mudslides, skateboarding, bullrush and tree climbing kept the children so occupied the school no longer needed a timeout area or as many teachers on patrol.

Instead of a playground, children used their imagination to play in a “loose parts pit” which contained junk such as wood, tyres and an old fire hose.

AUT professor of public health Grant Schofield said there are too many rules in modern playgrounds. “The great paradox of cotton-woolling children is it’s more dangerous in the long-run.” Children learn about consequences by taking risks, he said.

The research project morphed into something bigger when plans to upgrade playgrounds were stopped due to over-zealous safety regulations and costly play equipment.

“There was so many ridiculous health and safety regulations and the kids thought the static structures of playgrounds were boring.”

Via Instapundit.

Here are some wild-and-crazy playground designs from a Danish firm.

New Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds from Monstrum Set the Monkey Bars High for Innovation playgrounds kids

Teen in bullying death: I did nothing wrong

Felony stalking charges have been dropped against two Florida teens accused of bullying Rebecca Sedwick. The 12-year-old girl committed suicide in September.

“I do not feel I did anything wrong,” said Katelyn Roman, 13, on NBC’s Today show. Her former friend’s suicide taught her, “it’s not OK to bully and you should stand up … to bullying,” she added.

Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd said the two accused teens agreed in juvenile court to undergo counseling as a condition of the charges being dropped.

“Our goal is that these kids never bully anyone again, never torment anyone again,” Judd said.

Jose Baez, a high-profile lawyer, threatened to sue the sheriff for filing charges against the girls.

Did anti-bullying video lead to shooting?

An anti-bullying video that showed a girl bringing a gun to school may have influenced the 12-year-old shooter at Sparks Middle School, reports KRNV-TV in Reno.

Amaya Newton, an eighth grader, said the video was shown on Oct. 11, the last school day before the shootings.

“It was an anti-bullying movie but it could have gotten into his head about the girl scaring the bullies with the gun. She brought a gun on the bus to scare them and threatened to kill them,” Amaya told News 4.

Asked about the video’s message, she said, “That maybe it’s easier to scare your bullies than just to tell a teacher.”

The shooter was harassed by classmates, Amaya said. “Like tripping him in the hallways, bugging him for money . . . ” He never spoke up.

Teacher dies protecting students

A Marine veteran, Michael Landsberry survived two tours in Afghanistan with the Nevada Air National Guard. The Sparks (Nevada) middle school math teacher died trying to disarm a student yesterday. The 12-year-old shooter also wounded two boys, who are in stable condition, before killing himself.

“Mr. Landsberry’s heroic actions, by stepping toward the shooter, allowed time for other students in the playground area to flee,” said Washoe County School District Police Chief Mike Mieras.

Before opening fire, the boy said, “Why you people making fun of me, why you laughing at me?,” according to student Michelle Hernandez.

The boy used a Ruger 9 mm semiautomatic handgun that belonged to his parents, police said.

“The relentless, inflexible and unyielding focus on ‘test-taking’ and school rankings and scores” is to blame, writes Debra Feemster, a former Sparks principal, on Diane Ravitch’s blog. “If one teacher, counselor or administrator had had a few extra minutes to look into this student’s eyes and possibly connected with him in a meaningful way, maybe this catastrophe could have been averted.”

“Think of the children whose social and emotional needs are ignored in pursuit of test scores,” Ravitch writes.

Feemster and Ravitch are accusing Sparks Middle School staffers of ignoring students’ “social and emotional needs” and failing to prevent the shooting.

Let’s honor Mr. Landsberry’s courage and decency. Let’s not politicize a tragedy.

Building better bullies

Anti-bullying programs are backfiring, according to a new study. Students are more likely to be victimized by bullies if their school has an anti-bullying program, concludes University of Texas at Arlington criminologist Seokjin Jeong.

Many campaigns use videos to show examples of bullying and how to intervene. Students may be learning new ways to bully through social media and texting, says Jeong. Bullies learn how to get away with it, he fears.

As an intern with the California Department of Education, my daughter previewed an anti-bullying video by Peter, Paul and Mary, Don’t Laugh at Me.  She thought it would help bullies identify  more categories of  victims.

District monitors students’ social media posts

In hopes of preventing violence, drug abuse, bullying and suicide, a suburban Los Angeles school district is monitoring middle and high school students’ social media posts, reports CNN.

Glendale is paying $40,500 to Geo Listening to track middle and high school students’ posts on Twitter, Facebook and other social media.

When the idea was piloted last spring, monitoring identified a suicidal student. “We were able to save a life,” said Superintendent Richard Sheehan.

Recently, a student posted a photo of what appeared to be a gun, but turned out to be fake, Sheehan said.

“We had to educate the student on the dangers” of posting such photos, Sheehan said. “He was a good kid. … It had a good ending.”

Geo Listening sends a daily report to principals on which students’ comments could be causes for concern.

A 12-year-old Florida girl committed suicide after months of bullying on social media, her mother says.

Gay-unfriendly student wins speech case

In a teacher-initiated discussion on anti-gay bullying, a Michigan high school student said he “couldn’t accept gays” because of his Catholic faith. The economics teacher equated the statement to saying he “couldn’t accept blacks” and kicked him out of class, writing up a referral for “unacceptable behavior.”

In a June 19 ruling in Glowacki v. Howell Public School District, a federal district judge ruled that the teacher violated the student’s right to free expression, reports Ed Week.

U.S. District Judge Patrick J. Duggan of Detroit awarded damages of $1 to Daniel Glowacki, who was a junior at Howell High School in the fall of 2010.  Howell Public School District, which took no action against the student and reprimanded the teacher, was not liable, the judge ruled.

“Public schools must strive to provide a safe atmosphere conducive to learning for all students while fostering an environment that tolerates the expression of different viewpoints, even if unpopular, so as to equip students with the tools necessary for participation in a democratic society,” Judge Duggan said.

Glowacki did not disrupt the class, the judge ruled. McDowell engaged in viewpoint discrimination.

When asked about the move by the remaining students, McDowell said a student could not voice an opinion that “creates an uncomfortable learning environment for another student,” according to court papers.

Imagine how lively class discussion would be if no student was allowed to make another student feel uncomfortable.

Glowacki transferred to another economics class.