Artificial intelligence outscores 12th graders

A Japanese student celebrates her admission to an elite university.

A Japanese student celebrates her admission to the elite Tokyo University.

An artificial-intelligence program outscored the average Japanese high school senior on the English section of the college-entrance exam, reports the Wall Street Journal.

To-Robo earned a 95 (out of 200)on the multiple-choice English test, compared to 93.1 for the average test-taker. That’s nearly double the software’s score last year.

Japan’s collegebound students take two days of very high-stakes exams  in geography, history, civics, Japanese, foreign languages, math and science to qualify for public and private universities.

Developers are grooming To-Robo to qualify for the prestigious Tokyo University. (And then? Take classes?)

On the English portion, the AI program was able to choose the answer that best fits this conversation:

A: I hear your father is in the hospital.
B: Yes, and he has to have an operation next week.
A: ????. Let me know if I can do anything.
B: Thanks a lot.

To-Robo correctly picked “That’s too bad” to fill in the blank, rejecting “Exactly, yes,” “No problem” and “That’s a relief.”

The technology may be used for translations some day, developers said.

Virtual Stanford course draws 58,000

So far, 58,000 people in 175 countries have signed up for a free-, no-credit, online course in artificial intelligence, one of three pilot classes by Stanford computer science professors.

The online students will be ranked in comparison to the work of other online students and will receive a “statement of accomplishment,” reports the New York Times.

Introductory courses in database software and machine learning also will be offered.

The three online courses, which will employ both streaming Internet video and interactive technologies for quizzes and grading, have in the past been taught to smaller groups of Stanford students in campus lecture halls.

. . . How will the artificial intelligence instructors grade 58,000 students? The scientists said they would make extensive use of technology.

In place of office hours, they will use the Google moderator service, software that will allow students to vote on the best questions for the professors to respond to in an online chat and possibly video format. They are considering ways to personalize the exams to minimize cheating.

“I personally would like to see the equivalent of a Stanford computer science degree on the Web,” Dr. (Andrew) Ng said.

Dr. (Jennifer) Widom envisions allowing smaller colleges to supplement locally taught classes with online Stanford classes.