Tech tools tranform art education

AP Art History teachers are using “high-resolution digital images, immersive technology, and multimedia textbooks” to expose students to art works they’d never get to see face to face, reports Ed Week.

Personalized ed raises privacy concerns

Digital software can personalize instruction for students working at different levels and speeds. But fears about the privacy and security of students’ personal information are on the rise, reports PBS NewsHour.

At Miami’s iPrep Academy, Nicole Rasmuson teaches math, using “smart” software that analyzes mistakes, tracks how long a student takes to answer and checks for understanding, reports John Tulenko.

The software uses student data to customize lessons. “It’ll ask them, what are your interests?” says the teacher. “And so, in the word problems, it’ll — if one kid’s really interested in food, it’ll talk about cookies and that kind of stuff. It’ll even ask them, what are your friends’ names? And then it’ll put their friends’ names in the problems, too.”

Does it matter if software remembers that Jayden struggled with fractions, Maya likes soccer and Kim’s best friend in third grade was Jamie?

Dropouts need not apply in Silicon Valley

Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg dropped out of Harvard. Steve Jobs dropped out of Reed. But don’t believe that high-tech companies care more about “the caliber of your code” than your college degree, writes Lauren Weber in the Wall Street Journal.

High-tech companies — especially those in Silicon Valley — are more likely to demand a college degree for software developers than other employers, according to a Burning Glass Technologies survey.

In 95 percent of tech-sector job ads that specify a credential, the employer wants a bachelor’s degree or higher.

“Some firms are experimenting with ‘blind hiring‘ processes—designed to judge job applicants purely based on work samples rather than resumes,” writes Weber. However, that’s the exception.

Via Eduwonk.

Middle-school kids win start-up contest

Venture students present their idea at a start-up accelerator contest.

A team of Minneapolis middle-schoolers won a contest to sell a start-up idea, beating 10 adult teams, reports Beth Hawkins on Education Post.

The students attend Venture Academy, a three-year-old charter middle school that promotes entrepreneurship and includes a “maker space” where students can tinker.

Venture enrolls “a cross-section of the Twin Cities’ most disadvantaged youth: 45 percent Latino, 35 percent Black, 10 percent Native American and 10 percent white,” writes Hawkins. “More than 90 percent live in poverty, 28 percent are learning English and one-fourth are in special education.”

Students “design their own learning plans,” combining “hands-on experiences and online curricula,” she writes. “Last year its students, many of whom start out years behind, made more growth than all but one Minneapolis school serving the same grades.”

Teach girls to be imperfect


While boys are jumping off the monkey bars, most girls are taught to avoid risk, writes Girls Who Code founder Reshma Saujani on Medium. Girls do well in school, but aren’t prepared to tackle challenges that require trying, failing and persevering.

When psychologist Carol Dweck gave fifth graders a too-difficult assignment, bright girls were quick to give up, while bright boys “were more likely to redouble their efforts,” says Saujani. The higher a girl’s IQ, the more quickly she gave up.

An HP report found that men will apply for a job if they meet only 60% of the qualifications. But women? Women will apply only if they meet 100% of the qualifications. 100%!

Learning to code teaches bravery, she writes. “Coding is an endless process of trial and error, trying to get the right command in the right place.”

During the first lesson, a young girl will . . .  say she does not know what code to write. The teacher will look at her screen and she’ll see a blank text editor. . . . If she presses “UNDO” a few times, she’ll see that her student wrote code and deleted it. The student tried. She came close. But she didn’t get it exactly right. Instead of showing the progress that she made, she’d rather show nothing at all. Perfection or bust!

. . . My friend Lev Brie, who teaches intro to Java at Columbia University, tells a story about his office hours with computer science students. The guys who are struggling with an assignment will come in and say “Professor, there’s something wrong with my code.” The girls will come in and say, “Professor, there’s something wrong with me.”

“Failing well” enables girls to develop confidence and resilience, writes Rachel Simmons in a review of Jessica Lahey’s The Gift of Failure.

Education disrupted?


Students Fiona (left) and Lina do a lesson on their iPad Minis at the first AltSchool in San Francisco. Photo: Michael Short, San Francisco Chronicle

AltSchool is opening very tiny, very expensive private schools in the San Francisco area and New York City to “disrupt education,” writes Rebecca Mead in the New Yorker. 

The venture-capital-funded K-8 microschools, founded by a former Google exec, use technology to personalize learning.

A girl in the class was completing an offline task—reading a book about polar bears. A boy lay on his stomach on the carpeted floor, headphones on, using a Web site called BrainPOP to learn how to calculate the perimeters of basic shapes. “Two out of five!” he shouted . . .

Two girls sat together, laptops before them, using Google Images to scroll through pictures of seals for a social-studies assignment; occasionally, they paused to compare notes. Every so often, a student spoke with the teacher, a young woman in jeans and a loose top, her iPhone tucked under her thigh as she sat on the carpet. One girl had been using her laptop to research castles—an area of sustained interest. She and the teacher discussed princesses and castles, and whether they always went together. “That’s a good question,” the teacher said, and then asked, “Does America have princesses?”

Teachers use an app to communicate with parents. “A network of audio and video recorders captures “every word, action, and interaction, for potential analysis,” writes Mead.

Parents pay $30,000 a year. If their kids do well, is it the school?

The Silicon Valley-based Summit charter network personalizes learning for a wide range of students — many from low-income and working-class families. The schools are free to parents and operate on a modest budget. That’s a lot more disruptive.

Facebook engineers have helped the school develop its Personalized Learning Plan platform, which is being made “available, for free, to schools nationwide,” reports the Los Angeles Times. Summit is helping 19 district-run and charters schools access “teacher training, mentoring guidance and the software.”

Hablas Java? Parlez-vous Python?

Credit: Jillian Lees, Daily Titan

Credit: Jillian Lees, Daily Titan

Computer coding could substitute for a foreign language for Florida high school students applying to state universities under a bill moving through the Legislature, reports the Sun Sentinel.

State Sen. Jeremy Ring, a former Yahoo executive, thinks students should study a foreign language in the early grades, then learn coding in high school. People without technology skills “will be left behind,” he believes.

Miami-Dade Superintendent Alberto Carvalho is campaigning against the bill. It would make as much sense to call music a language, Carvalho said.

Is social media fueling teen suicide?


Credit: Victor Kerlow

Parents blame stress for the suicides of two 17-year-old girls in Plano, Texas. Two boys at New York City’s Fordham Prep jumped in front of trains a few weeks apart. The youth suicide rate has been rising since 2007, reports the Centers for Disease Control.

Social media may be fueling teen suicide by encouraging young people to become “disconnected from the reality of their own existences,” writes Dr. Keith Ablow.

Facebook, Twitter, Tinder and the like have made them think of themselves as mini-reality-TV versions of themselves. Too many of them see their lives as a series of flickering photos or quick videos. They need constant doses of admiration and constant confirmation of their tenuous existence, which come in the form of Facebook “likes” and Twitter “retweets.”

Heroin use is spreading, writes Ablow. “Heroin is just the powdered equivalent of text messaging, YouTube, Twitter, Facebook and the rest of the technology drugs Americans— especially American teen— are mainlining every single day.”

Young people are “increasingly fascinated with dramas about vampires and zombies,” he adds. “They know something about the walking dead.”

Teachers want tech, but need training

“It seems a waste,” writes Hechinger’s Meghan Murphy. Despite “millions of educational apps, millions of lesson plans available online, millions of laptops in the hands of students,” few teachers “find ways to infuse technology into their lessons.”

Teachers say they need more and better training, she writes. In a 2015 survey, 90 percent of teachers said technology was important for classroom success; almost two-thirds wanted to integrate it into their lessons, but said they needed more training.

Paul Andersen, a Bozeman High School science teacher and Montana Teacher of the Year, showed other teachers how to create YouTube tutorials to "flip" the classroom.

Paul Andersen, a Bozeman High science teacher, showed how to create YouTube tutorials to “flip” the classroom.

A nonprofit and several teacher-founded companies are developing interactive training methods to help teachers use digital tools effectively.

Jessica Anderson has “blended” her ninth-grade earth science class in Deer Lodge, Montana. She’s is the state’s Teacher of the Year for 2016.

On a day in December, a girl worked on her laptop to illustrate the cycle of water through the atmosphere, while a boy used Google 3-D glasses to take “a virtual field trip, researching various ways that communities across the globe use minerals.” Each student was on a self-directed path, writes Murphy.

BetterLesson, founded by former teachers from Atlanta and Boston,  provides “master teachers” who help someone like Anderson “create a strategic plan for doing blended learning” and a way to measure effectiveness, writes Murphy. “The team then meets along the way for coaching, feedback and accountability.”

When Jessica Lura taught a lesson on mood in writing, she used a PBS Kids video as a hook for her eighth-graders at Bullis Charter School in Los Altos, California, writes Murphy.

By the end of the lesson, they’ll have written sentences in various moods, written and recorded a monologue, and made that monologue come to life with an animation app.

Lura’s teaching is captured in the “Lesson Flow in Action” video on Graphite, which is Common Sense Media’s portal for teacher resources. Common Sense featured Lura because she’s one of their certified educators who integrates technology comfortably into her classroom. Her lesson plans are hosted with about 2,200 other lessons on the site, which also has almost 12,000 app reviews accessible to its more than 310,000 teacher members.

Another sites, Teachers Pay Teachers, provides free and paid resources. Teachers have earned $175 million for their lessons.

Le robot educateur est arrivant

European scientists are developing language-teaching machines to help five-year-olds learn a second language, reports Jacek Krywko in The Atlantic.

L2TOR (“El Tutor”) robots will use “microphones to listen, cameras to watch, and artificial neural networks that will analyze all the information that’s collected.” The project is funded by the European Union.

Designers believe the machines will be able to pick up nonverbal cues to monitor students’ boredom, confusion, happiness and sadness.

“The problem with previous generations of teaching machines was their complete lack of social intelligence,” says Stefan Kopp, a German L2TOR researcher. “Our robots will notice tears, smiles, frowns, yawns … and dynamically adjust to how a child feels.”

Designers will observe kindergarten teachers “and then program our robots to act like them,” Kopp says.

It sounds crazy to me. But a robot teacher that looks like a poodle and speaks French — well, who knows?

“New” and techy isn’t necessarily better, advises Andy Smarick on Star Wars and Education Reform. “Like the Empire and manymanymany other reform movements, today’s education reform also seems to place an outsized faith in technology.”