(Ex-)boy wins state honors in girls’ track 

Tia Goward, “Ice” Wangyot and Joei Vidad competed in the 200-meter sprint in the 2016 Alaska State Track Championships in Anchorage. Photo: Bob Hallinen/Alaska Dispatch News

A (biological) boy won all-Alaska honors in girls’ track and field, reports the Daily Caller.  Nattaphon “Ice” Wangyot, 18, who identifies as a girl, won fifth place in the 100-meter dash and third place in the 200-meter.

“I’m glad that this person is comfortable with who they are . . . but I don’t think it’s competitively completely 100-percent fair,” said Saskia Harrison, who just failed to qualify for the finals.

“Genetically a guy has more muscle mass than a girl, and if he’s racing against a girl, he may have an advantage, ” another runner, Peyton Young,  told the Alaska Dispatch News.

Wangyot, who moved to Alaska from Thailand two years ago, also competed in girls volleyball and girls basketball earlier this school year.

Is it fair to let someone who’s physically male compete against girls?

Winning school

Shawn Young, founder of Classcraft, uses the game in his physics class. 

Competition shouldn’t just be for athletes — or brainiacs — writes Greg Toppo in Game Plan for Learning in Education Next.  Academic competition can engage and motivate students, writes Toppo, author of The Game Believes in You: How Digital Play Can Make Our Kids Smarter.

Schools “use sports, games, social clubs, and band competitions to get students excited about coming to school,” he writes, but rarely “use academic competition to improve instruction for more than just a few top students.”

That’s starting to change.

Shawn Young, a 32-year-old Canadian physics teacher, has created a peer-driven classroom learning and management system, dubbed Classcraft, that resembles a low-tech, sword-and-sorcery video game. In it, students work in teams to meet the basic demands of school — showing up on time, working diligently, completing homework, behaving well in class, and encouraging each other to do the same — to earn “experience” and “health” points.

Arete (originally named Interstellar) lets students compete to solve math problems with rivals anywhere in the world. Tim Kelley was inspired by watching the school rowing team compete to improve their personal bests in endurance.

Kelley began to wonder how one might replicate that fighting spirit in the classroom. He soon imagined a computer application that would use students’ day-to-day results to match them up with comparably skilled contestants in head-to-head academic competition — in everything from classroom pickup games to bleacher-filling, live-broadcast amphitheater tournaments.

Yes, Kelley hopes to make math a spectator sport.


Wisconsin athlete suspended for tweet

It’s bad sportsmanship for high school fans to chant “air ball,” “season’s over” (during a tournament) or other insults declared the Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association in an email.

Mockery ensued. ESPN analyst Jay Bilas tweeted “WIAA acceptable” chants.

Instead of “airball,” he suggests: “We note your attempt did not reach the rim, but only to alert the clock operator that a reset is unnecessary.”

Also WIAA-acceptable: “We hope for a positive outcome while fully realizing that the result is not a negative reflection upon our guest.”

But the “s word” hit the fan, when a student athlete tweeted a vulgar response:

April Gehl, a three-sport star at Hilbert High, was suspended for five basketball games for her vulgar response. “I couldn’t believe it,” Gehl said. “I was like, ‘Really? For tweeting my opinion?’ I thought it was ridiculous.”

Does she have a free-speech right to use a vulgarity on social media? If not, isn’t a five-game suspension over the top?

Spartans may win bowl, but will they graduate?

LJ Scott runs past a block made by Donavon Clark to help Michigan State beat Oregon on Sept. 12. Credit:  Alice Kole/State News

Michigan State was a winner on the football field this year, qualifying for the national playoffs and the Cotton Bowl, writes Michael Dannenberg on Education Reform Now. But MSU is failing its neediest students.

Only three of 20 black males complete a bachelor’s degree in four years. Given six years, almost 82 percent of whites, 66 percent of Latinos and 57 percent of blacks will graduate.

Michigan State 2013 Race and Gender Gra-1duation Rates

“Florida State, which has a similar average SAT and higher percentage of low-income students and underrepresented minorities compared to Michigan State, has a close to a zero attainment gap between white and underrepresented minority students,” writes Dannenberg.

Michigan State doesn’t have the lowest graduation rate for football players. Among this season’s top-ranked teams, USC is a bit worse and University of North Carolina graduates only 31 percent of football players, according to Ed Central’s Ben Barrett.

Northwestern, Notre Dame and Stanford are at the top.

UNC’s graduation gap is huge: Football players are 57 percentage points less likely to complete a degree than other male students.

By contrast, “Clemson maintained an equally high graduation rate of 79 percent for both its football team and its overall student body.”

The flip side of ‘Friday Night Lights’

Friday Night Lights, a book and movie that became a TV series, featured the Permian Panthers’ quest for the state championship in football-obsessed Texas. A new movie called Carter High is about their rivals, a 1988 Dallas team that struggled, won — and then imploded.

Carter High’s Cowboys were disqualified by a star’s dubious algebra grade, then reinstated in time to win the state championship, reports the Dallas News.

Five days after winning state, three football players robbed a Jack in the Box at 2:30 a.m., pantyhose pulled over their heads. It would be the first of 21 robberies that police connected to 15 Carter neighborhood teenagers, including six from the football team.

The teens were convicted and sentenced to long prison terms. Carter High “was stripped of its championship after a court found that it had indeed violated the no-pass, no-play law.”

Prizes for none — except for sports

A number of Boston private schools no longer give academic prizes and honors “to keep those who don’t get them from feeling bad,” writes Concord Review creator Will Fitzhugh. However, these schools haven’t stopped keeping score in games or honoring elite athletes. It’s OK to excel in sports.

Andra Manson broke the high jump record for high school boys by jumping 7 feet 7 inches.

Andra Manson broke the high jump record for high school boys by jumping 7 feet, 7 inches.

The Boston Globe devotes about 150 pages a year to covering high school sports and one page a year to naming valedictorians at public high schools, he writes.

“We are comfortable encouraging, supporting, seeking and celebrating elite performance in high school sports,” writes Fitzhugh.  “We seem shy, embarrassed, reluctant, ashamed, and even afraid to encourage, support, and acknowledge — much less celebrate —outstanding academic work by high school students.”

When [mid-20th century] I was in a private school in Northern California, I won a “gold” medal for first place in a track meet of the Private School Conference of Northern California for the high jump [5’6”] — which I thought was pretty high.

My “peers” in the Bay Area public high schools at the time were already clearing 6 feet, but I was, in fact, not in their league.

. . . The current boys high school record, set in July 2002, by Andra Manson of Kingston, Jamaica, at a high school in Brenham, Texas, is 7 feet, 7 inches. [high jump, not pole vault].

Knowing that the record was moving up, a large group of high school athletes was motivated to work harder and jump higher, Fitzhugh concludes.

Baseball lessons

Juan Lagares scored twice in game 1 of the National League playoffs to help the Mets win. Photo: David J. Phillips, Associated Press

Edutopia links to baseball-themed activities for the World Series.

Statistics is a natural. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) offers Baseball Statistics Lesson Plans for grades 6-8,  a baseball statistics lesson for grades 3-5 and a geometry lesson for students in grades 6-8.

A star pitcher in the Negro Leagues, Satchel Paige was 43 when he started in the Major Leagues.

A star pitcher in the Negro Leagues, Satchel Paige was 43 when he started for the Cleveland Indians.

There are baseball-linked lessons in other subjects too. The Negro League eMuseum features primary sources, including a timeline and history modules covering various Negro League teams, as well as lesson plans for teachers.

Other lessons include: Narrative, Argumentative, and Informative Writing About BaseballBaseball Economics and The Physics of Baseball.

When I was in school, kids would sneak in transistor radios to follow the World Series, catching each other up during passing periods. Without weeks of playoffs first, the Series was more exciting.

Confederate flag flies high for Hurley Rebels

The Stars and Bars are painted on the front door of Hurley High in Virginia.

The Confederate battle flag flies proudly at Hurley High, a small, nearly all-white Appalachian town in southwest Virginia, reports USA Today. Hurley’s Rebels aren’t pulling the flag down.

 Chris Spencer is the only African-American student at Hurley High School, where the front doors he walks through each morning are painted with the Confederate battle flag, the first of many he’ll see on any given school day.

. . . The senior running back has a battle flag tattoo on the underside of his right forearm, where he cradles the ball on each carry.

The flag doesn’t symbolize racism, Spencer told USA Today Sports. “It’s our mascot. It just means our school.”

There are 180 students in the whole school. When the Rebels play football — the field was blasted out of the rock by coal miners — the whole town comes to cheer.

“Rebels” is the nickname at 200 or so high schools across the country, the story reports. Some are dropping the name, rebranding “Rebels” as non-Confederate and ending the use of Dixie as the fight song.

No ‘participation trophies’ for NFL player’s sons

When Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker James Harrison discovered his sons had been awarded “participation” awards “for nothing,” he sent the trophies back and explained his actions on Instagram:

“Everything in life should be earned and I’m not about to raise two boys to be men by making them believe that they are entitled to something just because they tried their best … cause sometimes your best is not enough, and that should drive you to want to do better … not cry and whine until somebody gives you something to shut u up and keep you happy.”

A walk-on at Kent State, Harrison went undrafted in 2002 because he was considered to be too small for the pros, reports ESPN.  Harrison “played a season in NFL Europe and was cut by the Baltimore Ravens before latching on with the Steelers and becoming a force.”

Cheating for college scholarships

Over 14 years, a community college basketball coach and academic advisor helped hundreds of athletes meet NCAA requirements by cheating, reports Brad Wolverton in the Chronicle of Higher Education. Most needed academic credits to transfer from junior colleges.

Coaches, parents or “handlers” hired “Mr. White” to help basketball, football and baseball players — and golfers.

A few are now playing in the pros.

Players “took” online or correspondence classes.

For some players, he says, he did their work outright. For others, he provided homework answers and papers that the students would submit themselves. At exam time, he lined up proctors and conspired with them to lie on behalf of students.

Mr. White made sure students didn’t do too well. Earning all A’s and B’s would have drawn suspicion.

Several Adams State classes were so easy, Mr. White says, he hardly needed the test keys.

One question on the final examination for Math 155, “Integrated Mathematics I,” a copy of which Mr. White shared with The Chronicle, asked students to find a pattern and then complete the blanks in this series:

5, 8, 11, 14, __, __, __, __

Many of his clients couldn’t have qualified for a college scholarship without his help, says Mr. White.