‘Lots of different ways to educate’ kids

‘Kids Are Different: There Are Lots of Different Ways to Educate Them,’ Glenn Harlan Reynolds (aka Instapundit) tells Julia Ryan in The Atlantic.

In The New School, Reynolds predicts “the future of American education is rooted in technology, choice and customization,” writes Ryan.

Vouchers, charters, homeschooling and private schools are competing for students, says Reynolds, a law professor at the University of Tennessee.

I think the sort of savior for the public school system is charter schools and things that let people exercise a lot of educational choice while within the public school system because when people stay within the public school system they retain loyalty to it, so they are more likely to support taxes for it and they get counted as enrollees for federal funding and the like.

Brick-and-mortar colleges won’t go away, but they’ll also have to compete for students, Reynolds predicts. 

There are a lot of older people who really don’t want to go back and spend four years as Joe College and Betty Coed going to classes but need to get an education. . . . Now whether it will also start to cut into the traditional 18 to 22 college population, it’s hard to say but if it’s going to be cost-effective, sure it will. If you’re 18 years old and you can go to college online, and also work in a job and also live at home, your net cost of going to college is vastly lower than if you leave home, go somewhere where you really can’t work much, have to pay to live in a dorm, have to buy a meal plan, and have to pay full tuition.

Reynolds’ daughter “did almost all of her high school” online.  She focused on one class at a time. “She finished a year’s worth of work in one class in three weeks of intensive effort instead of little dribs and drabs along the year the way they do in public school.”

Library to offer high school diplomas

Dropouts will be able to earn high school diplomas at Los Angeles libraries, which will partner with an online learning company. Students will take courses online, but will meet at the library to interact with other adult learners and receive help.

Via Marginal Revolution.

A teacher in virtual charter hell

After 15 Months in Virtual Charter Hell, Darcy Bedortha quit her job as a high school English teacher for K12 Inc., the nation’s largest virtual education company. She couldn’t meet students’ learning needs, she writes in Education Week Teacher.

K12 pays full-time teachers $42,000 a year to teach a minimum of 226 students, writes Bedortha. Some full-timers have more than 300 students.

Students can enroll at any time.

In a given day in mid-November I would grade introductory assignments, diagnostic essays and end-of-semester projects, and everything in between, for each course (this month I had 30 separate courses). I found it to be impossible to meet the learning needs of my students in that situation.

Many students are phantoms, Bedortha writes. Fewer than 10 percent of students “attended” the weekly 30-minute “class,” which used an interactive blackboard. Only a small percentage communicated by email.

Most were behind in high school credits and “could not afford another failure.”

. . .  as I wrote this in early December, nearly 80 percent of our students were failing their classes.  At that time there were 303 students (12 percent of the school) enrolled in special education programs – and 259 of them were failing while 17 had no grade at all. Eighty-two percent of the 9th graders were failing. 

Other virtual schools face similar failure rates, writes Bedortha. Only 37.6 percent of students at full-time virtual schools graduate on time, compared to 79.4 percent of all public high school students according to a July 2012 National Education Policy Center report.

Virtual schools do best for mature, self-directed learners or for students with a homeschooling parent. Most students who’ve failed in schools with in-person teachers won’t succeed with less personal contact with a teacher. But they need an alternative to traditional schooling.

Virtual schools are bound to attract transient students. We need a way to fund virtual charters so they’re not compensated for students who aren’t using the school’s services.

More MOOCs

Dhawal Shah signed up for one of the first MOOCs from Stanford in November, 2011 and started  Class Central to track new courses on offer. MOOCs are growing rapidly, he writes on EdSurge. There are about 100 MOOCs in 2012 and almost 700 starting in 2013. More than 1200 courses have been announced so far for 2014. He estimates there will be 10 million MOOC registrants.


Completion rates are low, Shah concedes. “It’s still not clear whether they have a sustainable business model.” But students keep signing up.

Coursera offers nearly half of all MOOCs, but competition is growing.

Class Central lists a number of education and teaching MOOCs. California’s High Tech High has two starting in January: New School Creation and Deeper Learning 101. MATCH Teacher Residency offers Surviving Your Rookie Year of Teaching.

‘We are creating Walmarts of higher ed’

“Speeding up college and making it cheaper risks dumbing it down,” according to some professors, reports Timothy Pratt in The Atlantic.

Under pressure to turn out more students, more quickly and for less money, and to tie graduates’ skills to workforce needs, higher-education institutions and policy makers have been busy reducing the number of required credits, giving credit for life experience, and cutting some courses, while putting others online.

Now critics are raising the alarm that speeding up college and making it cheaper risks dumbing it down.

. . . “We are creating Walmarts of higher education—convenient, cheap, and second-rate,” says Karen Arnold, associate professor at the Educational Leadership and Higher Education Department at Boston College.

The Campaign for the Future of Higher Education — mostly university professors — will meet in January to discuss the rise of online courses and performance-based funding.

If states fund universities based on measures such as graduation rates, rather than enrollment, faculty will face a “subtle pressure” to pass more students, says Rudy Fichtenbaum, president of the American Association of University Professors.

Only 56.1 percent of college students earn a degree within six years. President Obama has called for increasing the number of college graduates to make the U.S. first in the world in educated workers.

Top higher ed stories of 2013

The rise of MOOCS lead Ed Central’s Top Ten Higher Ed Stories of 2013. Also on the list: Southern New Hampshire University’s College for America, “the first school to award federal aid based on direct assessment of students’ learning,” instead of credit hours; President Obama’s plan to rank colleges by “value” and “merit aid madness.”

Future MOOCs: Just for jobs?

In a few years, MOOCs went from fad to destroyer of higher ed to flop, but MOOCs have a future, writes Rachelle DeJong on Minding the Campus. It lies “somewhere between adapting to a niche clientele and rebounding to capture” hundreds of thousands of students.

She envisions three possibilites.

First, MOOCs could become “advanced technical schools and outsourced employee training,” as predicted by Walter Russell Mead.

Udacity founder Sebastian Thrun is is moving in this direction after giving up on competing with brick-and-mortar BA programs.

The new MOOC-ish master’s degree program at Georgia Tech is an example: AT&T is a major funder of the Georgia Tech initiative, planning to send its employees through the program and to hire additional high-performing program graduates. Forbes reports that a growing number of businesses are authorizing MOOC versions of their training courses.

MOOCs could be “usefully middlebrow,” a sort of Readers Digest version of college courses, suggests University of Michigan professor Jonathan Freedman. It might be college lite, “but it’s not comic books, either,” writes DeJong.

It’s also possible no-cost MOOCs will “encourage renewed interest in the humanities,” DeJong writes. When college costs are high, students are drawn to what they see as practical STEM courses.

MOOC completion rates aren’t all that low

MOOC completion rates aren’t all that low, argues Kevin Carey.  Only 4 percent of registrants in a Penn study completed their Coursera course, but that includes a majority who never logged on or quit after one log in.

Study: Online learning boosts completion

Online learning raises completion rates for community college students, concludes a new study. That contradicts previous research, which found higher failure rates for online community college students in two states.

Online students want more guidance

Online community college students expect a lot of support. Online instructors think students should learn independently. The misaligned expectations lead to “frustration, confusion, and tension,” concludes a new study.