Carnival of Homeschooling

Notes From A Homeschooled Mom is hosting this week’s Carnival of Homeschooling.

Carnival of Homeschooling

Dewey’s Treehouse is hosting this week’s Carnival of Homeschooling.

Opting out of testing

And I mean really opting out. Dean Donald Heller of Michigan State’s Education School explains why he let his younger daughter drop out of high school:

We knew she was not as engaged as well, and to understand why, we talked to her, spoke with her teachers and counselor, and examined the curriculum in her school. What we came to realize was that her high school did not meet her needs as a learner. While she was an interdisciplinary thinker and was intellectually curious about a number of different creative areas, her school was highly traditional in its structure and curriculum. We concluded it had largely a singular focus: to improve performance of students on the state tests rather than to encourage them to grow intellectually and to develop a breadth of learning. Our daughter was performing well on tests, but she understood that she was not reaching her full potential as a student.

Read the whole thing. The last paragraph, in particular, is rather touching.

Public schools are of remarkably uneven quality, and their goals are not always perfectly in sync with the goals of parents (or of students). The mania — and it’s a bona fide mania at this point, I think — for standardized testing as a way of determining school, class, teacher, and student quality is driving schools in particular directions that may or may not equate to “quality” in the eyes of all of the school’s potential clientele. It’s hard to please everyone.

One the one hand, your children are only young once, and they are largely your responsibility. If you can do better for your kids, you probably should. If your kids can do better for themselves, well, then they probably should, too.

But on the other, carrying that train of thought out to its logical conclusion suggests that the public school system is basically a remedial measure for parents without the desire and/or ability to do better for their kids, in terms of cognitive and social development. We might not be unjustified to start thinking of schools as a sort of “safety net” for parents and students.

But that’s a very different view of public education than is held by many — and probably most — people in this country. Public education is more often seen, I think, as a sort of public institution at large, and the primary way of producing an informed citizenry, with private schools and homeschooling and such serving as a sort of minor variation on the theme. Our public schools, we might think, are part of the fabric of our democracy.

Then the paradox: to serve the entire democracy, we must serve the disadvantaged. But serving the disadvantaged requires tremendous resources, and often involves the schools essentially replacing parents who are unable or unwilling to raise their students in a manner considered by the voting public to be “responsibly”. Yet more tightly schools focus their services on the most disadvantaged students, though, the more I think we can expect schools to bring upon themselves the mantle of being remedial institutions that “the right sort of people” want little or nothing to do with. And that will probably mean less public support for those schools as well.

It might be the case that public schools (and we, their supporters), to ensure their survival and their place in civic life, must accept that the best we can hope for is to marginally improve the lives of disadvantaged students, and that fixing them entirely is simply not a realistic undertaking.

Carnival of Homeschooling

Small World at Home is hosting this week’s Carnival of Homeschooling.

Carnival of Homeschooling

The Foodie Army Wife is hosting this week’s Carnival of Homeschooling.

HomeGrownHearts Academy blogs on how to have a horrible homeschool experience.

Carnival of Homeschooling

Every Bed of Roses is hosting this week’s Carnival of Homeschooling.

Carnival of Homeschooling

The Carnival of Homeschooling‘s graduation edition is up at  HomeschoolBuzz.

Carnival of Homeschooling

Judy of Consent Of The Governed is hosting this week’s Carnival of Homeschooling. The theme is wisdom.

Shivram Gandhi, a “random teenager interested in self-improvement,” writes about his plan to improve his own “fluid intelligence.” He calls it “Project IQ.”

At Pious Homemaking, Andrea is focusing on character training. She’s starting with attentiveness.

Zach Braff: Wish I Was Here


Greg Forster is funding a Hollywood movie, Zach Braff’s partially Kickstart-funded Wish I Was Here. The Scrubs star plays a struggling actor, father and husband, who at 35 who still fantasizes about “being the great futuristic Space-Knight he’d always dreamed he’d be as a little kid.”

When his ailing father can no longer afford to pay for private school for his two kids (ages 5 and 12) and the only available public school is on its last legs, Aidan reluctantly agrees to attempt to home-school them.

. . . Aidan decides to scrap the traditional academic curriculum and come up with his own.

The movie will be released on July 18.

Carnival of Homeschooling

Why Homeschool is hosting this week’s Carnival of Homeschooling, which honors Eliza Doolittle Day.