‘College isn’t for us’

“College isn’t for us,” Skylar Myers’ friend Randall told her in seventh grade when she talked about her private school’s College Day. In eighth grade, while she was applying for high school scholarships, Randall was arrested for the first time, Myers writes in the Hechinger Report.
Skylar Myers
Her other friends from the block — Miguel, Malik, Shaquencia and Jonathan — never made it to college. Their future held teen pregnancies, arrests, dropping out of school.

Myers’ parents weren’t college educated, but they made their only child’s education a priority. Her father taught her to read at 2 and started multiplication at 4. And they sent her to private school.

“I just thought you were some type of special case,” Randall said years later. “Your daddy was around and caring [about your educational needs]… if any of us had to go it would be you.”

Randall went to inner-city schools. He joined a gang, so he’d feel safe. He dropped out of high school and earned a GED. After three stints in jail, he was sent to prison. “I’ve always been just as smart as you, but . . . outside the understanding of what’s normally accepted as ‘smart’ or ‘intelligent,’” he told his “homie.”

Myers earned a film studies degree from the University of California in San Diego.

Community college students are getting younger

Community colleges are attracting more “traditional-age” students. And, thanks to dual enrollment of high school students, more community college students are under the age of 18.

Algebra or statistics?

Most new students place into remedial math at California community colleges. Eighty percent will never pass a college-level math course. Some colleges have boosted success rates by teaching statistics and quantitative reasoning, rather than algebra, to non-STEM students.

Florida colleges will let students opt for college-level courses, even if they’ve done poorly on a placement exam. Instead of letting students ignore the placement results, let them try the test again, a graduate student suggests.

Building a ‘completion culture’

A community college honor society is trying to build a “culture of completion” on campuses where graduation rates are low.

An online tool helps students track their progress toward their goals at a California college with limited counseling staff.

Scholarships for all in Syracuse

Every Syracuse public school student can afford college, thanks to a public-private collaboration called Say Yes Syracuse. Support services start in kindergarten. High school graduates get a full scholarship at state colleges and universities — and at many private colleges.

‘Paycheck’ aid shows promise

Disbursing student aid in smaller amounts every two weeks, “Aid Like a Paycheck,” encourages low-income college students to work harder in school and manage money better, a new study shows.

At a Hamilton Project forum today, participants presented new ideas for redesigning Pell Grants, income-based loan repayment and college cost calculators. 

‘Undermatching’ can be a blessing

“Undermatching” — going to a less selective college — can be a blessing for students who’d otherwise be a small frog in a big pond, writes a community college dean.

How to succeed at community college

Community colleges are finding ways to engage students and raise their odds of success, a new study finds. One college warns students they must show up for class or be kicked out.

In Tennessee, volunteer “success coaches” help first-generation students fill out college forms, apply for financial aid and navigate the system.

MOOCs are hot, but do they work?

MOOCs (massive open online courses) are red hot in higher education, but how much are MOOC students learning?

Community college students are more likely to drop out of online classes and earn lower grades, a new study finds.

Easy come, easy go

In the name of access, many community colleges set students up to fail by allowing late enrollment and letting unprepared students take college-level courses, an administrator writes.