Employers: Grads aren’t prepared for work

Most employers say college graduates aren’t prepared for work, reports a new survey. College students tend to be overconfident about their readiness.

“College for all” — or even job training for all — won’t revive the economy, argues a new book. We don’t lack skilled workers. We lack skilled jobs.

Entrepreneurship for all

With foundation help, community colleges are helping fund and mentor local entrepreneurs in exchange for student internships.

More states link funding to outcomes

Sixteen states now link higher education funding to student outcomes, such as graduation rates, and more are planning to do so. Tennessee links 95 percent of college funding to performance measures. Illinois links 1 percent.

80% of college students text in class

Eighty percent of college students text in class, according to a survey by Barney McCoy, a University of Nebraska professor.

More than 60 percent say they’re distracted by using digital devices; even more say other people’s use is distracting.


Campus divestment effort targets fossil fuels

Campus activists are trying to persuade college and university foundations to divest in fossil-fuel companies. The campaign’s first success is a community college foundation in California. However, fossil-fuel companies account for just 1 percent of the Foothill-De Anza Foundation’s $33 million portfolio.

A coal divestment campaign failed at Brown, reports the Daily Caller, which mocks the massive carbon footprints of the jet-setting organizers.

Learn from the California Raisins

Learn from the California Raisins how to market community colleges, advises a community college dean.

The first national accountability system designed for community colleges — the Voluntary Framework of Accountability – launched last week.

Frustrated with the same questions …

From Imgur: Frustrated with the same old questions, my professor ripped off his shirt in the middle of the lecture . . .

‘College isn’t for us’

“College isn’t for us,” Skylar Myers’ friend Randall told her in seventh grade when she talked about her private school’s College Day. In eighth grade, while she was applying for high school scholarships, Randall was arrested for the first time, Myers writes in the Hechinger Report.
Skylar Myers
Her other friends from the block — Miguel, Malik, Shaquencia and Jonathan — never made it to college. Their future held teen pregnancies, arrests, dropping out of school.

Myers’ parents weren’t college educated, but they made their only child’s education a priority. Her father taught her to read at 2 and started multiplication at 4. And they sent her to private school.

“I just thought you were some type of special case,” Randall said years later. “Your daddy was around and caring [about your educational needs]… if any of us had to go it would be you.”

Randall went to inner-city schools. He joined a gang, so he’d feel safe. He dropped out of high school and earned a GED. After three stints in jail, he was sent to prison. “I’ve always been just as smart as you, but . . . outside the understanding of what’s normally accepted as ‘smart’ or ‘intelligent,’” he told his “homie.”

Myers earned a film studies degree from the University of California in San Diego.

Community college students are getting younger

Community colleges are attracting more “traditional-age” students. And, thanks to dual enrollment of high school students, more community college students are under the age of 18.

Algebra or statistics?

Most new students place into remedial math at California community colleges. Eighty percent will never pass a college-level math course. Some colleges have boosted success rates by teaching statistics and quantitative reasoning, rather than algebra, to non-STEM students.

Florida colleges will let students opt for college-level courses, even if they’ve done poorly on a placement exam. Instead of letting students ignore the placement results, let them try the test again, a graduate student suggests.