Report: Fed aid drives up college costs

Federal student aid hasn’t helped lower-income students go to college, concludes a report by the Center for College Affordability and Productivity. Instead, federal aid has enabled colleges to raise tuition.

2-year degree takes 4 years

A “two-year” degree typically takes more than four years in California. Furthermore, associate-degree graduates earn a median of 78 credits — well over the 60 required — raising costs and taking up community college seats.

College for more — since 1940

Bachelors_degree_gif

This MetricMaps GIF shows how college attainment has spread. In 1940, no more than 7 percent of adults in any state had a bachelor’s degree, notes Vox. That rose to 10 percent by 1960. Fifty years later, the best-educated states are nearing 40 percent.

Corinthian crashes

Under investigation for falsifying job placement rates, for-profit Corinthian Colleges will sell 85 campuses and close 12 others. The national company runs Everest, WyoTech and Heald career colleges.

New name, new identity

A Florida community college is changing its name — and offering 10 bachelor’s degrees, dorms,  intercollegiate athletics and study-abroad opportunities. The newly named Florida SouthWestern State College also will recruit “brighter” applicants and out-of-state students. State universities aren’t happy about the competition.

An Amazon for aid

Single Stop, known for helping low-income community college students access   benefits, is creating an Amazon-like platform to link needy people with government and community aid.  That will include student grants and loans, Medicaid, unemployment insurance, food stamps and food pantries

Text ‘nudges’ boost persistence

Text-message reminders about applying for financial aid boosted second-year enrollment rates for community college students at a cost of $5 per student.

Simplifying student aid

A two-question postcard would replace the 108-question Free Application for Financial Aid (Fafsa) under a bipartisan bill proposed in the Senate. Students would get an estimate of their financial aid eligibility before they apply to colleges.

An open door to debt?

Community colleges provide easy access — to failure and debt, argues a new book by remedial English instructors. Poorly prepared students have little hope of success, they write. Raising admissions requirements would strengthen academic classes for prepared students and redirect the unprepared to short-term job training that might help them improve their lives.

Home again: The boomerang grads

Annie Kasinecz, 27, lives with her mother in Downers Grove, Illinois. She borrowed $75,000 to earn a degree in advertising and public relations at Loyola University in Chicago. Now working as a project coordinator, she’s lived at home rent-free for four years.  Credit Damon Casarez for The New York Times

The Boomerang Kids Won’t Leave home, predicts the New York Times Magazine. With college loans and low-paying jobs, they can’t afford to pay rent.

One in five people in their 20s and early 30s is currently living with his or her parents. And 60 percent of all young adults receive financial support from them. That’s a significant increase from a generation ago, when only one in 10 young adults moved back home and few received financial support.

. . . Those who graduated college as the housing market and financial system were imploding faced the highest debt burden of any graduating class in history. Nearly 45 percent of 25-year-olds, for instance, have outstanding loans, with an average debt above $20,000. . . . And more than half of recent college graduates are unemployed or underemployed, meaning they make substandard wages in jobs that don’t require a college degree.

The photographer, who lives at home and freelances, was graduated from an art college with $120,000 in debt. 

Alexandria Romo, 28, also a Loyola graduate, earned an economics degree but says she “had no idea what I was doing when I took out those loans” at the age of 18. She borrowed $90,000. Romo wishes she’d been taught about student loans, math and finance before borrowing at 12.5 percent interest. Romo lives at home in Austin and works at a security-guard company. Her dream is to be an environmentalist.