Staffer fired for correcting a kid’s spelling

A student, “Nathan,” tweeted “Close school tammarow PLEASE” to Frederick County (Maryland) Public Schools.

Katie Nash, the district’s social media director, replied “but then how would you learn to spell ‘tomorrow’? :)”, reports the Frederick News-Post.

Image result for nash tweet schoolHow do you spell “stupid?”

The exchange was retweeted. District officials told Nash to stop tweeting. Then they fired her.

After only a few months on the job, she said, “I sort of would have expected that there would have been some counseling or some suggestions on how to improve.”

“Nathan,” who’d exchanged other tweets with Nash before she was shut down, told the News-Post he wasn’t offended.

S-t-u-p-i-d.

Via Reason.

Prof: Stop saying ‘microaggression’

Stop using “microaggression” or “training” students to avoid microaggressions, writes Scott. O. Lilienfeld, an Emory psychology professor, in  Microaggressions: Strong Claims, Inadequate Evidence. The core premises of microaggression theory are unproven, he argues. The study was published in Perspectives on Psychological Science, a peer-reviewed journal.

Microagressions” — “slights, insults, invalidations and indignities” — threaten the health of “marginalized groups,” say proponents of the theory. Unintentional slights are as bad as deliberate “micro-assaults.”

Image result for microaggressions

“Racial and cultural insensitivities” are real, he writes. But there’s “negligible evidence” that slights and snubs cause psychological harm or that they reflect prejudice or aggression.

On many college campuses, students receive training on microaggressions and warning lists of what not to say, he writes. Occidental College is considering a system to encourage students to report their professors’ microaggressions.

Lilienfeld became interested in the issue when he learned that some colleges were “telling students that statements such as “I believe that American is a land of opportunity” and “I believe that the most qualified person should get the job” constituted microaggressions,” reports Campus Reform.

“I came to the conclusion that although the microaggression concept almost surely contains a kernel of truth, it is highly problematic on numerous grounds and is not close to being ready for real-world application” he explained.

“Sensitizing individuals to subtle signs of potential anger might inadvertently end up making many of them ‘perceive’ slights even when they are not present,” Lilienfeld said. That could “exacerbate racial tensions at colleges.”

Conor Friedersdorf wrote about the rise of the victimhood culture in The Atlantic in 2015.

“You guys” is on the no-say list at University of Wisconsin at River Falls “Ugly” is banned because it “can be connected back to white supremacist, ableist, sizeist standards of beauty.” It’s bad to say “bad.” But, Heat Street points out, “dick” is OK.

Will movie inspire more black math aces?

Hidden Figures, which is getting good reviews, tells the story of three “colored computers” who helped the U.S. win the space race. As blacks in segregated Virginia in 1961 and women in NASA’s very male culture, they overcame many obstacles.

The movie is based on Margot Lee Shatterly’s book about Katherine JohnsonDorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson, who started at NASA doing data entry and ended up doing the math that put John Glenn in space — and got him back alive.

Andre Perry, writing in the Washington Monthly, hopes the movie will inspire more black women to pursue math and science careers. While 24 percent of black women over the age of 25 have earned at least a bachelor’s degree, just 2 percent of black women worked as scientists or engineers in 2010, according the National Science Foundation, Perry notes.

Like the women of Hidden Figures, high-achieving black students in the sciences are well aware of the stereotypes that brand them incapable. And like their predecessors, many students are driven by these perceptions.

Mathematician Monica Jackson, an associate professor of statistics at American University, says talented black girls need “good schools, challenging classes and quality teachers” — and “parents, friends, teachers and mentors” that provide support.

A Wichita math club for African-American girls in elementary school is named for NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson, one of the subjects of “Hidden Figures,” reports Chandler Boese in the Wichita Eagle.

Eleven girls in the Katherine Johnson Scholar Sisters meet twice a week after school for advanced math lessons.

“It’s fun,” said 9-year-old Phoenix Neely. “We get to learn math.”

Another member of the club, Phallin Jackson, said she likes math because “You get to be smart.”

The fourth- and fifth-graders are starting to learn algebra.

I wonder why the club is just for girls.

Onion: Fisher-Price releases Fetal Activity Gym

Fisher-Price has released a new “in utero fetal activity gym,” reports The Onion.

“Whether they’re batting at the friendly toucans in order to harden their cartilage into bone or tapping the multicolored light-up palm tree to test out their sense of vision once their eyes open at 28 weeks, the Fisher-Price Rainforest Friends Prenatal Activity Gym is guaranteed to give your fetus a head start and keep it happy and occupied,” said director of marketing Kevin Goldbaum, adding that the eight different preloaded songs will help fetuses grow the thalamic brain connections needed to process sound.

It’s satire. But just barely.

Teachers like snow days too

In a paean to snow days, Mary Morris, who teaches at Rush Strong School in Strawberry Plains, Tenn., turns Adele’s “Hello” into “Snow.”

Technology is turning snow days into virtual school days in some districts, reports CNN.

King: Opportunity saves lives

Orphaned at the age of 12, John King “was fortunate that I had teachers and mentors who kept my life on the right path,” the outgoing Education secretary tells NPR’s Cory Turner.  “Schools and educational opportunities can save lives.”

His likely successor, Betsy DeVos, is a billionaire philanthropist educated in private schools. Like King, she helped found a public charter school, but that’s about the only parallel.

“What matters is beliefs and actions,” not “biography,” King says in the interview.

President Barack Obama and Education Secretary John King, Jr.

President Barack Obama and Education Secretary John King, Jr. Photo: Carlos Barria / Reuters

The new Education secretary should realize that “the department is a civil rights agency with a responsibility to protect the civil rights of students and to ensure that school is a safe and supportive place for all kids,” he says.

In his official “exit memo”, King brags about progress over the last eight years, writes Emily DeRuy in The Atlantic.

He starts with expanding access to preschool,” then “touts record high-school graduation rates, a reduction in what the administration dubbed ‘dropout factories,’ and the expansion of technology (as a tool for creating individualized learning plans) in classrooms.”

He lauds the fact that it has become easier to apply for federal financial aid to pay for college, and the development of a college “scorecard” to help students evaluate which colleges might be a good fit.

The bipartisan Every Student Succeeds Act, a revision of the main federal education law, “has a strong focus on underserved students,” King stresses. All students need “a quality education that prepares them for college and careers.”

Obama’s education legacy

What will be Obama’s lasting education legacy? asks PBS NewsHour.

“In President Obama’s first state of the union, he said . . . that every American needs at least one year of post-secondary training to succeed in today’s economy,” says Inside Higher Ed’s Scott Jaschik.

Congress “never touched” the president’s proposal for “free” community college, but “districts all over the country took the idea and ran with it,” he says.

President Obama scored some first-term “victories on teacher quality, academic standards, and school turnarounds,” writes Ed Week‘s Alyson Klein but second-term “backlash threatened the longevity of his signature initiatives and made it virtually impossible to enact similarly sweeping change in new areas, including early-childhood education.”

On the new administration’s way in the door, Obama and (Education Secretary Arne) Duncan were handed $100 billion for education, including more than $4 billion to push almost any K-12 policy they chose, thanks to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, which was crafted to jump-start the stalled economy.

Obama and Duncan took the money—which came with few congressional strings—and . . . created the Race to the Top competition, which sought to reward states with grants of up to $700 million for embracing the president’s priorities on school turnarounds, tests, state data systems, and teacher evaluation based in part on student outcomes.

Obama’s Education Department used its financial clout to push states to adopt Common Core standards, undercutting its credibility as “state standards.”
Graduation rates are up. Reading and math scores on the National Assessment of Educational Progress are down.

‘I can’t answer test questions on my poems’

Image result for sara holbrook poems "real case" midnight

I Can’t Answer These Texas Standardized Test Questions About My Own Poems, writes Sara Holbrook in the Huffington Post.

Old STAAR questions are released so teachers can prepare students for the exam. Holbrook checked out the questions on A Real Case, which appeared on the 2014 Grade 7 STAAR Reading Test, and Midnight, appearing on the 2013 Grade 8 STAAR Reading Test. Both poems are published in Walking on the Boundaries of Change.

A teacher wrote to ask her how to answer this question on Midnight:

“Dividing the poem into two stanzas allows the poet to?

A) compare the speaker’s schedule with the train’s schedule.

B ) ask questions to keep the reader guessing about what will happen

C) contrast the speaker’s feelings about weekends and Mondays

D) incorporate reminders for the reader about where the action takes place.

The answer is C) to contrast the speaker’s feelings about weekends and Mondays.

The teacher had been given test-prep materials that omitted the stanza break. Holbrook sent him an image of the published poem.

Why had she put the stanza break there? “When I read it aloud (I’m a performance poet), I pause there.”

Holbrook includes all the questions on A Real Case. She concludes, “any test that questions the motivations of the author without asking the author is a big baloney sandwich. Mostly test makers do this to dead people who can’t protest. But I’m not dead.

“I protest.”

Busy work kills love of reading

School assignments killed his son’s love of reading, writes Tony on Leading Motivated Learners.

Reading logs and summaries became a chore, he writes. Written responses were “never checked or responded to.”

“Book reports . . . became more about drawing some amazing picture to go on the cover of the report than anything else,” Tony complains. “They were also so formulaic that little thought went into completing them.”

Johann Sebastian Bach

Johann Sebastian Bach

Instead of reading a passage, then answering comprehension questions, his son “would just read the questions and the multiple choice answers and then scan the passage for the correct answer – no reading really involved there.”

Close readings, a Common Core staple, meant “reading the same book for months and doing endless assignments around that one book.”

Even before the close reading era, my daughter would complain that it took forever to read a book, hunt down its symbolism, “journal” about it and beat it to death in class.

We did almost none of this when I was in school, except for writing book reports.

My fifth-grade teacher told us to write a 1 1/2-page book report for every book we read. I was reading a book a day, so it was a lot of work. I suspected she didn’t read the reports. One day, in my largest handwriting and widest margins, I wrote:

Johann Sebastian Bach is a book about Johann Sebastian Bach. Sometimes Johann Sebastian Bach was called Johann Sebastian Bach, but sometimes Johann Sebastian Bach was called Johann, Johann Sebastian or Bach. However, Johann Sebastian Bach was not called Sebastian or Sebastian Bach.

That was the first page. On the second page, I wrote:

 Johann Sebastian Bach is a very good book for boys and girls who are interested in reading about Johann Sebastian Bach.

The teacher never said a word about it. I kept churning out book reports, because that’s the sort of person I am. did not lose my love of reading.

In sixth grade, we just had to fill out an index card for every book we read. For years after, the teacher used my stack — 184 books, I  think — to terrify her new students.

Robert Pondiscio wrote on Facebook: “You know what REALLY kills the love of reading: Not teaching kids how to @#%*! read…. ”

How can teachers teach reading without boring readers?

Update: A New Jersey district lets teachers assign short excerpts from a novel for close reading, then show a movie based on the book. In my school days, we watched the movie of Julius Caesar (James Mason!) and Pride and Prejudice (Laurence Olivier!), but we read whole books, not excerpts.

 Tired of school

Image result for apathetic students

“Academic apathy” is common in high school, writes Laura Handby Hudgens on The Federalist. She thinks  students are burning out in middle school.

“Up until sixth grade I had never made less than an A in any of my classes,” Leo told her. “By seventh grade, I was just tired. I just didn’t care anymore. I just quit trying.”

When her son started kindergarten, she “looked around his classroom and saw rows of tiny tables and chairs, but not a single toy. Where was the little kitchen with the miniature pots and pans? Where were the blocks?”

Fast-forward six years, and Johnny sounds a lot like Leo. On the one hand, he’s happy at school. He likes his friends, and he enjoys their time together at recess (all 15 minutes of it). Johnny thinks his teachers are cool. He rarely gets into trouble. He loves P.E.

 On the other hand, he dislikes actual school—the lessons, the homework, the constant rigor combined with a classroom full of apathetic peers.
By nature Johnny is inquisitive. He likes to learn. But the school day is hectic and exhausting. There’s little time for enjoying what he’s learned and even less time to enjoy being 12 years old. School has become a source of nearly constant frustration, and Johnny is tired. At the age of 12, Johnny is weary of school.
As a mother and a teacher, she thinks kids need more play, more recess, more sleep and age-appropriate instruction to avoid 12-year-old burn out.