Move education faculty to urban schools

Teacher-training programs should move to the schools, writes Andre Perry, founding dean of urban education at Davenport University, on the Hechinger Report.

Teachers in training need more time to practice their craft in the settings they’ll work in, he writes. Education faculty at urban universities should “move their offices from the ivory tower into urban schools.”

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Comments

  1. This makes sense. I’ve wondered for decades why ed programs don’t do as BS programs in nursing (and in med technology), and put students in practice situations with both professionals (same level and subject) and faculty supervision. BSN students often have to move from the main campus to a medical campus for their last two years – often to urban or inner-city locations. Real world experience.

  2. tim-10-ber says:

    Just about every other profession trains their employees in the real world, on the job so they learn from others, from their teammates, from their mistakes and from their students. Education tends to throw new teachers in the classroom and says “good luck”. I like this idea!

    • Educationally Incorrect says:

      Many people in the ed world sound like Forrest Gump when he says “I’m not a smart man, but I know what love is.”

      Except it’s more like “I’m not a rocket scientist, but I know how kids learn.”

      That’s why there seems to be this inclination to present teaching as some grand theory. I really think that what goes on in ed school is driven by “I is smart faculty two.”

      • Since the 50s, ed schools have been regarded as having the worst teachers on campus – not to mention the lack of real-world orientation, either in instructional methods or content. A relative’s recent pre-service master’s was far better, because the focus was on the practical and because all students were assigned – all year – to an experienced local teacher in their discipline and at their level (not sure about el ed, or if the program was all MS-HS). Of course, they all had undergrad arts/science majors in their fields.

        However, I’m convinced that the real problems start in k-5 (plus some MS programs) and anything after that is trying to play catch-up. For kids fully dependent on schools for their education, it’s not working

        • tim-10-ber says:

          “However, I’m convinced that the real problems start in k-5 (plus some MS programs) and anything after that is trying to play catch-up. For kids fully dependent on schools for their education, it’s not working.”

          Totally agree with this comment!