STEM split: Women choose bio, but not physics

Two-thirds of Princeton’s molecular biology majors are female, but 76.2 percent of physics majors are male, reports The Daily Princetonian.

The most female-dominated majors for the class of ’16 are art and archaeology at 92.9 percent, psychology at 87.3 percent and comparative literature at 81.3 percent.

The most male-dominated majors are mathematics at 86.7 percent, philosophy at 77.8 percent and computer science at 77.3 percent. History, politics, sociology, classics, music — and astrophysics — are roughly even.

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Comments

  1. Bostonian says:

    Different fractions of men and women are interested in different things. We can accept explanation of fields where there are more women — how many articles have you read about sexism stopping men from majoring in art or psychology? But if there are more men than women studying something, that is taken as a sign of discrimination to be corrected.

  2. Okay, Art and Archaeology are together because?

    (I would guess that almost all those majors are interested in Art, not Archaeology.)

    • Mark Roulo says:

      They both start with the letter ‘A’?
      I wondered about that grouping, too.

  3. Miller Smith says:

    Wow. The largest disparity in the genders occurs in favor of females. When will this abuse of men come to a stop? O, I’m sorry men are always the perpetrators and women are the victims. Sorry about that I was just looking at the numbers.

    • Numbers are a tool of the patriarchy.
      What really matters is how you FEEL. Unless you’re male.

  4. cranberry says:

    Ridiculous.

    The women students accepted to Princeton can do the math. Look up Princeton’s Common Data Set to see how high the university’s test scores are. 75% of the student body scored above 700 on the Math portion of the SAT. 25% of the student body scored 800 on math.

    Matter of fact, modern molecular biology requires math. It requires working with large sets of data on computers.

    They don’t want to do physics, computer science or philosophy (on the whole.) They want to be doctors, researchers, and psychiatrists.

    There’s nothing wrong with that.

  5. In other news, men like basketball more than knitting, women like knitting more than basketball, and women generally enjoy doing these with their free time other than solely working physics problems–even when they are physics majors.

    The sun also rises in the east.

    I’m still mad I was duped by feminists who told me men and women were the same.

  6. cranberry says:

    Crimson Wife, things have changed since you completed college.

    Requirements for the Molecular Biology major at Princeton: http://molbio.princeton.edu/undergraduate/requirements/major-requirements

    From the “typical courses of study” page: “Students concentrating in Molecular Biology acquire strong foundations in math, general and organic chemistry, and physics, by taking introductory courses in these different departments. All students then take an introductory Molecular Biology course (MOL 214 Introduction to Cellular and Molecular Biology or MOL 215/EEB 215 Quantitative Principles in Cell and Molecular Biology ).”

    Pre-meds could do the math for physics, but they want to be doctors. As in other parts of the college chase these days, the women are more organized. They have their eyes on medical school or a career in research.

  7. Crimson Wife says:

    I studied biology and psychology and while bio required a year of calculus, it could be the lowest track offered at the school. Certain of the concentrations within the bio major required the lowest level track of the physics sequence but the one I chose (human biology) didn’t require any physics.

    Physics and engineering required the mid-level calculus sequence plus linear algebra and differential equations. Engineering required at least a year of physics and it had to be the mid-level track or higher. Physics majors obviously had to do the highest-level track.