Early transfers risk debt but no degree

Most community college students who transfer to a four-year college or university haven’t completed a two-year degree. That lowers their chances of completing a bachelor’s degree, a new study finds. Early transfers often find many of their credits won’t count — or won’t help them complete a major. Often they end up with debt but no degree.

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Comments

  1. The issue with the credits not transferring and/or not counting toward a major is a common problem from what I’ve heard. A lot of these situations could probably be avoided if students could get better advice from their “counselors.”

  2. Mark Roulo says:

    “Early transfers often find many of their credits won’t count — or won’t help them complete a major. Often they end up with debt but no degree.”
     
    Do these credits transfer or help to complete a major if th CC student doesn’t transfer early? Transfering early doesn’t seem to be the problem here.

    • Students who complete an associate degree have a much better chance of getting all or nearly all their credits counted when they transfer. In a number of states, community colleges are aligning courses with state universities so that associate-degree grads can transfer with junior standing.

      • Mark Roulo says:

        So the earlier CC credits still don’t transfer, but the students find out while finishing their AA degree at the CC (which is cheaper)?

        • GoogleMaster says:

          I think the point is that, if they’ve finished the AA requirements, and the courses are aligned with those at the state universities, then they’ve presumably taken appropriate credits for the first two years at the U.

          If instead they’ve merely taken “some coursework” at the community college, but not completed the AA, it’s entirely possible that all they’ve finished are a bunch of remedial math and reading classes, which of course won’t transfer to a four-year school.

  3. In most CC’s, you can get a transfer agreement which will work for most in-state schools, but you have to follow the courses exactly. In most cases, you might need to take an extra 6-12 credit hours to get your bachelors (past the 120-132 credit hours total).