Core English in action

At a Florida middle school, the Common Core doesn’t just mean new standards, educators believe. It calls for”a package of teaching techniques – such as students working in small and large groups,” writes John O’Connor on the Hechinger Report.

Dawn Norris plans lessons for her sixth graders, but has given up some control. “It’s up to students to question, challenge and prod each other toward the goal written on the classroom whiteboard.”
A classroom chart explaining the differences between claims, claim evidence and commentary. Hillsborough County schools are teaching the Three Cs as the building blocks of student writing. (Photo: John O'Connor)
Norris breaks the students into groups to write about how different cultures tell the same fairy story.

Two girls discuss Chinye, a West African version of Cinderella.

“And that’s your claim, which is your topic sentence,” one boy tells another. “This is your thesis, the central claim.”

“Supporting ideas with evidence from a text is a central pillar of the Common Core language arts standards,” writes O’Connor.

“In Christina Phillips’ sixth-grade classroom, students learn about the “three C’s – claim, claim evidence and commentary.”

“This pig made his house of bricks,” reads Phillips. “Is that factual evidence from the text? Or is that my opinion?”

“That’s evidence!” a student says.

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