Blend, flip, disrupt

In Blend, flip, disrupt, I report on a a Blended Learning in K-12 conference at Stanford’s Hoover Institution.

When she introduced Khan Academy videos and quizzes to her sixth-grade math students, Suney Park had to “give up control,” she said.  “That’s hard.”

But the software lets her students work at their own level and their own pace, moving on only when they’ve mastered a lesson. More are reaching proficiency, says Park, who teaches at Eastside College Prep, a tuition-free private school in all-minority, low-income East Palo Alto, California.

“I’ll never go back,” Park said.

Before she tried blended learning, she struggled to “differentiate” instruction for students at very different levels. “You can try it, but you can’t sustain it,” she said. “Teaching to the middle is the only way to survive.” Now, her advanced students aren’t working on a task devised to “keep them out of the way.” They’re moving ahead.

Personalizing lessons for each student’s needs and providing immediate, actionable feedback on each student’s mastery (or not) are two of the biggest advantages of blended learning, said Michael Horn, co-founder of the Christensen Institute.

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