Common Core needs a czar

Common Core needs a czar, argues John Wilson, former head of the National Education Association, in Education Week. Wilson backs the standards but blames bureaucrats for botching implementation.

Bureaucrats want  to “standardize everything about the education process from lesson plans to testing,” writes Wilson.

To deal with the chaos, we desperately need a single authority to oversee the implementation, call out bad practices, and recommend policy changes to the politicians. We need a Common Core Czar.

. . . the czar should be able to offer a new vision of American education that is rooted in shared standards, an understanding of local and state authority over curriculum, and empowerment of teachers to select lesson plans that assure all their students learn.

. . .  Testing for accountability should be limited to a scientific sampling. High-stakes tests have poisoned the system and need to be eliminated.

If standardization is the problem, how can a czar be the solution?

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Comments

  1. Stacy in NJ says:

    Yes, because bureaucratic bloat and ineffectiveness will be solved by another level of bureaucratic bloat.

    God save us from well intentioned and well educated idiots like John Wilson.

  2. Crimson Wife says:

    How about we ditch Common Core entirely and let teachers who actually KNOW the students decide what they should learn instead of some committee of bureaucrats thousands of miles away in D.C.?

  3. Wait, this wasn’t satirical?

    Seriously, the only way that a Common Core czar would help education is if the czar bungled the mess so badly that CC is scrapped, or if Rand Paul is accidentally put in the position.

  4. Michael E. Lopez says:

    I always suspect when someone calls for a “czar” or a “special executive” or issues any of those standard just-put-someone-in-charge-with-new-powers cries, that they have someone in mind for the job — someone who shares their initials.

    And their birthday.

    And their parents.

  5. Just get rid of NCLB, Common Core, and the entire Department of Education.

    Create a Bureau of Educational Metrics and Statistics under some other cabinet department.  Publish all the stats.  Let everyone else sort out the meaning and derive policy from it.

    • Don’t even do that. Put the responsibility on the states, who have the Constitutional powers to do so. Any sliver of federal oversight could be used to restore control in the future.

      • If there’s no uniform testing across the states, there’s no way to see if states are watering down their standards to appear to look “better” even if they’re not required to by law.  This is why NAEP should be continued (and maybe expanded) , even if the rest is given the heave-ho.

  6. Ann in L.A. says:

    How do you square the circle he drew here: “American education that is rooted in shared standards, an understanding of local and state authority over curriculum”

    He wants shared standards…but, local control. What if the locals disagree with the standards?

  7. “To deal with the chaos, we desperately need a single authority to oversee the implementation, call out bad practices, and recommend policy changes to the politicians. We need a Common Core Czar.”

    Oh yeah. *That* will fix everything.

    I don’t know who he is, but he sounds like an idiot.

    • “To deal with the chaos, we desperately need a single authority to oversee the implementation, call out bad practices, and recommend policy changes to the politicians. We need a Common Core Czar.”
      And here I thought those responsibilities fell on the President and his Secretary of Education. They must be too busy fundraising…

    • Ann in L.A. says:

      It is rather stunning to see someone assume that one person can do a better job of managing the educations of tens of millions of kids than their parents, their teachers, and their schools. Is there a word that goes even beyond “hubris”?

      • Yeah, although its a phrase not a word.

        Human nature.

        The desire to have *someone* in charge is reflexive and it’s the opposite, the free market dynamic where everyone’s in charge, that requires an effort of will to embrace.

  8. People have too much freedom. Obviously, more totalitarianism is the solution.