Duncan fails to block state testing law

California will scrap its state testing system to field-test new exams linked to Common Core Standards. That means schools won’t be held accountable for students’ progress and parents won’t see how their children are doing.

The Los Angeles will have to defer plans “to use student test scores to evaluate teachers,” notes the Los Angeles Times. “Such performance reviews would be impossible because the results could not be compared to previous years.”

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan threatened to withhold federal funds, but legislators ignored him, reports EdSource Today.

Veteran education watchers in California could not recall a presidential cabinet officer ever attempting to block state legislation and certainly not in the heavy handed way U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan attempted to do on Monday night.

In an extraordinary move, Duncan issued an after-hours statement in an effort to head off a vote by the California Legislature the next day on Assembly Bill 484. The bill calls for administering field tests tied to the Common Core State Standards this spring in place of the California Standards Tests in math and English that have have been a fixture on the California education landscape for 15 years.

California won’t “look in the rear view mirror with outdated tests, no matter how it sits with officials in Washington,” said State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson.

Under AB 484,  only the high school exit exam and science tests in three grades, required by federal law, would survive.

It could be three to five years before the state reintroduces an Algebra I or Geometry test, creating a big gap in information on student achievement in those and other subjects.

Students in districts offering the field test would get either the math or English language arts part of the test, not both. Because the new test must be taken on computers, districts that don’t have enough computers wouldn’t participate in the pilot.

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