Too much Spanish = hostile environment?

An Arizona nursing student claims she was suspended for complaining that classmates disrupted classes by speaking Spanish. In her lawsuit, Terri Bennett, 50, said classmates spoke Spanish during lessons — apparently translating for non-English speakers — and primarily spoke Spanish during labs, clinicals and other activities. That made it hard for her to learn and created a “hostile environment,” she complained. In addition, the Pima Community College nursing program director called her a “bigot and a bitch,” she charged, before suspending her on charges of intimidation (arguing with an instructor about a test answer), discrimination and harassment.

Students complained that Bennett was harassing and intimidating them for having private conversations in Spanish, David Kutzler, the nursing program director, told the Daily Caller.  He denies calling Bennett a “bigot and a bitch.”

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  1. The other side of the story:

    In an email exchange with TheDC, Kutzler, a retired 20-year veteran of the U.S. Air Force, said that these allegations and many others are false.

    http://dailycaller.com/2013/07/22/dc-exclusive-administrator-answers-charges-of-student-allegedly-booted-for-favoring-english/

    • When students are booted from ed schools for not having the “proper dispositions”, denials from such as Kutzler are far less credible than the accusation.

      This bears investigation, because nurses who cannot speak English cannot render proper care to patients who speak only English.  Non-English speakers should be ineligible for the program.

      • Portland says:

        I don’t see a reason to make non-english speakers ineligible for the program. It is really up to the employers to determine if the nurse has sufficient verbal communication skills. The college just needs to make sure the nurse has acquired the requisite nursing skills. That said, I certainly understand how discomforting the situation can be. I think the whole class could benefit on basic grace and courtesy.

        • I looked on the AZ Board of Nursing and the licensure exam websites and found nothing about taking the exam in anything other than English. If that is indeed the case, all classes, labs and practicums should demand English.