College enrollments fall by 1.8%

College enrollments declined by 1.8 percent in fall 2012 with for-profits and community colleges showing the biggest drops. That could show that more people are finding jobs, but it undercuts President Obama’s goal of making the U.S. first in the world in college-educated workers.

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  1. Far too many people enroll in colleges currently. Many take on large personal debts in the process. They incur
    large out of pocket expenses, lose both income and social security accruals by not entering the work force, face a significant chance of failing to complete their degree, and
    often graduate with heavy debt.

  2. Mark Roulo says:

    “That could show that more people are finding jobs, but it undercuts President Obama’s goal of making the U.S. first in the world in college-educated workers.”

    The Community College drop is probably because the Community Colleges are cutting enrollment for budget reasons, not because fewer people want to attend.

    Example: “Over the last three years, community college funding has been cut by $809 million, and the impact of the cuts has been a historic 17 percent drop in enrollment over that same time.”

    http://www.cafwd.org/reporting/entry/california-community-colleges-facing-overcrowding

  3. CarolineSF says:

    One important thing that undercuts the goal of making the United States No. 1 in college-educated workers is the fact that in other developed nations, college is free, or all but, including living expenses — while in the United States, it’s the expense of a lifetime for many families. This is the only nation where students routinely graduate from college in crushing debt.

    • Peace Corps says:

      “college is free”

      College is not free; somehow it is paid for.

      • Right. In other nations, college is not a significant, burdensome or painful personal/family expense. Either way, that blows the notion of comparing the U.S. college rate to any other developed nation’s college rate out of the water.

    • Most of those other countries also track; kids take an exam (age 11-13 approx) which determines which kids go on to a college-prep school and which kids go to some sort of vo tech or apprenticeship program. Those kids who have not the capacity and/or the motivation for academic work are removed from the academic track. I’m betting that those same countries do not admit the leftward end of the disabled curve into regular elementary school, either.

  4. Anyone considering college should google:

    Marty Nemko – College is a Ripoff

    In a nutshell, the bachelor’s degree is the most overrated product in america today…