Unplugged — and unheated

Superstorm Sandy forced digital kids to unplug, notes a lifestyle piece in the New York Times.

BLANK screens. Cellphones on the fritz. Wii games sitting dormant in darkened rec rooms. For a swath of teenagers and preteens on the East Coast, the power failures that followed Hurricane Sandy last month represented the first time in their young lives that they were totally off the grid, without the ability to text, play Minecraft, video-chat, check Facebook, or send updates to Twitter.

And so on. Some poor teens were forced to talk to their parents.

Unmentioned are thousands of kids and their parents who’ve been freezing in the dark for nearly two weeks. They don’t have running water or toilets that flush. No wonder they think they’ve been forgotten.

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Comments

  1. “Unmentioned are thousands of kids and their parents who’ve been freezing in the dark for nearly two weeks. They don’t have running water or toilets that flush.”
    You’d think there’d be more outrage over this. Incredible.

  2. Beyond parody.

    I can’t find a list of the people who died in New York and New Jersey.

    You’d think that rather than call a few friends for a lifestyle piece about “going unplugged,” it might have been more newsworthy to speak with the thousands of people who are homeless and freezing.

    But heck, why pass up a chance to preach Luddism? Not the New York Times fashion & style section.

  3. Eric Jablow says:

    The New York Times uses the old Saul Steinberg New Yorker map as its guide to the important parts of New York City. Anything South of 23rd street, North of Cathedral Parkway, or in the Outer Boroughs is as unimportant to The Times as Aberdeen, South Dakota.