Raising the Ritalin generation

We’re way too quick to label active boys as hyperactive, writes Bronwen Hruska in Raising the Ritalin Generation.

Will did not bounce off walls. He wasn’t particularly antsy. He didn’t exhibit any behaviors I’d associated with attention deficit or hyperactivity. He was an 8-year-old boy with normal 8-year-old boy energy — at least that’s what I’d deduced from scrutinizing his friends.

But the third-grade teacher suggested an evaluation.

. . .  once you start looking for a problem, someone’s going to find one, and attention deficit has become the go-to diagnosis, increasing by an average of 5.5 percent a year between 2003 and 2007, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As of 2010, according to the National Health Interview Survey, 8.4 percent, or 5.2 million children, between the ages of 3 and 17 had been given diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

There’s no test for ADHD, she writes. Teachers’ impressions —  they’re asked to rate “squirminess” on a scale of one to five — make a big difference.

Will was diagnosed as being inattentive in distracting situations, such as school, and prescribed Ritalin. “It was not to be taken at home, or on weekends, or vacations. He didn’t need to be medicated for regular life.”

He took the drug in fourth grade and had a great year, but quit in fifth grade. He’s done fine without it. “For him, it was a matter of growing up, settling down and learning how to get organized,” writes Hruska. “Kids learn to speak, lose baby teeth and hit puberty at a variety of ages. We might remind ourselves that the ability to settle into being a focused student is simply a developmental milestone; there’s no magical age at which this happens.”

 

 

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