What are kids reading in school?

Learning Matters looks at what kids are reading in school and how Common Core Standards will change that.

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Comments

  1. This Common Core stuff makes me sick to my stomach. Of course, basals don’t teach kids to read; the research against this approach is overwhelming. Also, the idea that non-fiction teaches students to read more competently is a falsehood created by bureaucrats and book publishers. As Merrow states in the video (4:20 mark) “With the common core’s emphasis on non-fiction, some schools will need to buy new editions. . . . That’s great for the publishing companies; not such good news for schools with tight budgets.” It’s always about money.

    There is also little evidence that “comprehension is a skill to be practiced. . . .” Stephen Krashen, Nancie Atwell, John Hattie and other luminaries in the field of literacy have researched literacy for decades. Their work says quite plainly that the books do the work. Let kids pick books of interest, fiction or non-fiction, at their reading level, and let them read. Don’t stop them, don’t quiz them, and don’t give them a workbook or a worksheet. Let them discuss their books and write about them.

    Throw out all reading programs, and let kids read. The rest will take care of itself.

    • Roger Sweeny says:

      Let kids pick books of interest, fiction or non-fiction, at their reading level, and let them read. Don’t stop them, don’t quiz them, and don’t give them a workbook or a worksheet. Let them discuss their books and write about them. Throw out all reading programs, and let kids read. The rest will take care of itself.

      But then they wouldn’t need us.

      It’s always about money.

      • Of course they need us. Kids don’t walk into a room of books and understand how to choose. They need to learn how to evaluate what’s right for them. They need to learn genre, book structure, search, reflection and connection.

        We need to teach them powerful tools, places like Goodreads.com, so they can locate, plan, track, rate and share books. KidBlog, so they can write freely and share their opinions with others. We have to teach them how to analyze, so they can make connections to other topics.

        They need us very much.

        They don’t need mindless automatons, distributing workbooks and multiple-choice quizzes.