Hess: Top 10 edu-stories of 2012

Why wait for 2012, when Rick Hess has the top Ten Edu-Stories We’ll Be Reading in the new year?

Among his headlines of the future: “GOP presidential nominee abandons primary season attacks on Department of Education; talks up education reform in push for moderates.” Meanwhile, Republicans will feud over Common Core standards, he predicts.

Despite doubts about Race to the Top’s implementation, “Obama campaign makes Race to the Top, push on college affordability a centerpiece in effort to woo suburban swing voters.”

Hess also foresees a backlash against aggressive anti-bullying campaigns after elementary school boys are suspended for tussling and name-calling. (Think zero tolerance.)

Rewriting No Child Left Behind will be left till 2013, he predicts.

Finally: “Mixed results for the Khan Academy‘s ‘flipped’ classroom lead some educators and policymakers to worry that the model doesn’t work for kids who don’t do the requisite work at home. One expert notes, ‘The kids who didn’t do their reading or homework before are the same kids who aren’t viewing their lessons and lectures now.’”

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Comments

  1. Roger Sweeny says:

    The kids who didn’t do their reading or homework before are the same kids who aren’t viewing their lessons and lectures now.

    This just in: “Water is wet.”

    Okay, that’s nasty and snarky. But there are lots of people who will never do well in school. Yet we force them to be there for thirteen years, and try to increase that to seventeen. Is that really such a good idea? How much do most people actually learn? Try a mental experiment. If you had to retake the final exam in every high school and college course you took, how many could you pass? I’ll bet even the unusually well-educated and involved readers of this blog won’t need more than two hands to count them.