Pomp, circumstance and then what?

Few high schools track graduates to see if they’re succeeding in college or careers. Some states are linking high school and college data to evaluate success rates.

Also on Community College Spotlight:  Community college construction has stopped in Los Angeles. The district has billions in bond money, but can’t afford to pay for building maintenance or for instructors to use the new space.

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Comments

  1. It can actually be kind of hard to track graduates. My university constantly presses for data on what graduates have done/where they are but unless they keep up with the Alumni association (=put up with constant requests for donations) or stay in touch with some of their profs, it’s hard to know where people are.

  2. ricki said “My university constantly presses for data on what graduates have done/where they are but unless they keep up with the Alumni association (=put up with constant requests for donations) or stay in touch with some of their profs, it’s hard to know where people are.”

    This and I think a lot of graduates (myself included) bumbled their way through higher ed with no actual goal in mind, perhaps driven to go to college due to the expectations of others rather than a personal desire orgoal. I went and got a thoroughly useles liberal arts degree. I’ve spent the last 20 years at a continually shrinking corporation trying to hold on to a mediocre sales job so I can continue to enjoy the middle class lifestyle I’ve grown accustomed to. Unlike some who have striven and succeeded with an educational and professional (career?) goal in mind I’ve ended up in a comfort zone where I work to live not live to work. I’d be very hard pressed to find similar pay and benefits as I have achieved to date were I to try to retrain and move on to something different.