College students skimp on costly textbooks

College students are doing without college textbooks to save money, a survey finds.

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Comments

  1. Deirdre Mundy says:

    I don’t think this is really news— when I was in college 15 years ago, kids were sharing books and xeroxing from e-reserve to save money,

    Also, a lot of us held off buying books until we saw how much we’d use them. If the professor was only going to use one or two chapters, reserve was a better option. If you were going to use it daily, it was easier to buy.

    The only kids who buy every book without thinking are the ones who don’t have to spend their own money!

  2. Over half of my profs gave lectures directly from the textbook (many of whom wrote the text) , so I bought few of the required books when I was in school.

  3. Mark Roulo says:

    “The only kids who buy every book without thinking are the ones who don’t have to spend their own money!”

    Or the ones taking mostly STEM classes.

  4. In college in the 90s, I bought all the required books (I was a print journalism/Russian major, so it was only about $200 a term). However, I eventually realized that a lot of the books were very lightly used in class.

    I’ve been thinking of doing some Russian tutoring and when I researched the local college’s Russian textbook choices, their American-published beginner textbook costs something like $170. I just checked out the library copy. When I was in college, our textbooks were mostly Russian-published, and they rarely cost more than $30. Granted, the Russian textbooks weren’t super trendy and with-it.

  5. Soapbox0916 says:

    I agree with Mark, I don’t remember many fluff books in my STEM classes. I bought most of my books, and they were heavy, and expensive, but I did need them.