Another reason to avoid college debt

College students are trying prostitution to pay off student loans (and credit card debt), reports the Huffington Post. Young “sugar babies” seek older “sugar daddies” (or “mommies”) through various online sites.

Over the past few years, the number of college students using our site has exploded,” says Brandon Wade, the 41-year-old founder of Seeking Arrangement. Of the site’s approximately 800,000 members, Wade estimates that 35 percent are students.

The site places pop-up ads that appear when someone types “tuition help” or “financial aid” into a search engine. College sugar baby membership has increased from 38,303 in 2007 to 179,906 this year. There are 10 “babies” for every “daddy.”

New York University ranks first in sugar babies with 498 signed up; Harvard University ranks ninth with 231. Let’s hope they all signed up as a joke and this is one of those phony trend stories.

British students should be able to sell a kidney to pay off student loans, says a Scottish professor.

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Comments

  1. This is starting to sound like Central Africa.

  2. Richard Nieporent says:

    British students should be able to sell a kidney to pay off student loans, says a Scottish professor.

    When I first read the headline I though it must be satire. However, that was not the case. Professor Roff was all too serious. Since the good professor is so concerned about boosting the number of organs available to save lives would it be immodest of me to propose that she immediately volunteer to have all of her organs harvested now.

  3. Michael E. Lopez says:

    Expressing shock at something like this is like expressing shock at internet porn.

    “My GOD! They put it on computers!”

    The practice has always been around — it’s just modernizing.

    Which isn’t to say I endorse the practice — it’s entirely unseemly. But college ladies have been doing this sort of thing ever since they let young ladies go to college.

    That young men are doing it might be news, depending on the numbers — but even that might not be so novel.

  4. Let’s hope they all signed up as a joke and this is one of those phony trend stories.

    Because why?