‘Gifted’ teaching leads to gifted students

Low-income children taught with “gifted” techniques were more likely to be identified as gifted a few years later in a pilot experiment in high-poverty North Carolina elementary schools. Project Bright IDEA trained K-2 teachers in techniques used for gifted students.

The study found that within three years, the number of children identified by their school districts as being academically and intellectually gifted ranged from 15 percent to 20 percent, compared to just 10 percent of children in a control group. The year the project began, no third-graders from the schools in the study had been identified as gifted.

Black and Latino students are more likely to get “dumbed-down instruction,” said William “Sandy” Darity, professor at Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy. “So one of the exciting things about Project Bright IDEA is the premise that you provide this high-level curriculum and instruction to all the kids.”

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Comments

  1. Michael E. Lopez says:

    But if you actually give excellent instruction to all students, how are the upper classes going to distinguish themselves from the dross of humanity?

    THIS MUST BE STOPPED IMMEDIATELY!

  2. Roger Sweeny says:

    But if you actually give excellent instruction to all students, how are the upper classes going to distinguish themselves from the dross of humanity?

    Simple. They will go to school longer and have “higher” degrees.

  3. We are using “gifted” techniques in my grade level (fourth grade, largely low-income second language learners) and are finding that more of our students ARE being identified as GATE after they leave us than before they arrived in our rooms. Our district does blanket GATE testing in second grade and many students who didn’t qualify then, do qualify after spending a year with us. More importantly than that, to us, ALL of the students enjoy the enriched opportunities to learn and develop more refined, more complex methods of thinking. It’s a joy to witness.

  4. What are the ‘gifted techniques’ that are so successful?

  5. Hmm… higher expectations leading to better results?

  6. Well, it doesn’t lead to giftedness.

    If they’re measuring the top 20% as gifted, then I don’t think they actually know what the word means.