Digital disruption in education

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush calls for digital learning to disrupt the education monopoly on Reason TV.

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Comments

  1. once again, a politician (or former politician) who underestimates the challenge in building technology that works for all students (I’ve tried tons of computer programs with my kids, and the best system that has worked is the pencil and paper Kumon!)

    The cynic in me imagines Jeb is getting some consulting dollars from some high tech companies . ..

  2. RMD, I think you misunderstand what he’s talking about here. He’s saying that highly qualified and skilled teachers can teach to students not in their own classrooms via technology, whether it’s a virtual classroom or recored sequence of lessons. He’s not talking about adding software to a in-classroom computer for students to access. He’s really lamenting the availablity of highly skilled teachers and suggeting the way to make them available is via technology.

  3. Refreshing to hear somebody say something other than, “In order to raise test scores, teachers need to tutor during lunch.”

    I’m a Democrat but Republicans know more about what needs to be done to improve schools.

  4. Mike in Texas says:

    Robert,

    You are so wrong I’m astounded’; the Republicans want nothing more than to destroy education in the name of profits for education management companies.

  5. RMD, I think you misunderstand what he’s talking about here. He’s saying that highly qualified and skilled teachers can teach to students not in their own classrooms via technology, whether it’s a virtual classroom or recored sequence of lessons. He’s not talking about adding software to a in-classroom computer for students to access. He’s really lamenting the availablity of highly skilled teachers and suggeting the way to make them available is via technology.

    Let’s think about this. Let’s assume that’s his message. By the way, his organization has many member who are technology industry leaders. They are looking for a large market for their products. They are not disinterested, alturistic philanthopists on this issue.

    Note that he uses Florida’s current per-student payment as his benchmark for the cost per student for online solutions. Why? Because his backers want to make a product.

    Now, I will state that I do believe that American teachers should make a believable case for allowing realistic measures of performance and competence to be elements in hiring and firing. Why? Because I believe that a human teacher is better for most students than online learning. All current products used by students are in the main used by students who are motivated to learn (or their parents motivate them), i.e., homeschooled, gifted, and charter school students. None of this means that the online learning will persuade Johnny the unengaged to learn.

    I oppose putting the majority of public education online. Why? Well, one national standard curriculum means that there will be eventually one supplier, or one supplier and a faux-competitor kept alive by the dominant competitor to avoid charges of monopoly. In the end, Indians will work for much lower wages than Americans. There are a heck of a lot of well-educated Indians. Any system of deciding who’s a “master teacher” will not specify that the teachers must be American citizens. Once it’s online, there’s nothing to stop them from outsourcing American education to India. They will do it, it’s only a matter of time.

    The economic consequences for our local, state, and national economies would be devastating. As much as one might complain about the high cost of teaching staff, their wages remain in our economy. Exporting those jobs to India would not be in the best interest of the nation.

  6. Peace Corps says:

    I think a good teacher in the classroom is better than an excellent one online; however, a good teacher any way that you can get one (online, part-time, etc.) is better than either a bad teacher or no teacher in the classroom.