Teacher charged with discussing ham

In Cadiz, Spain, a Muslim student charged his geography teacher with xenophobia and racism for discussing ham, reports Pajamas Media.  The teacher, a 20-year veteran, had mentioned that the cold mountain climate of the Granada town of Trevélez is conducive to curing ham.

The students’ parents filed a police complaint; the local prosecutor doesn’t plan to press charges.

Mohamed Ali, president of the Spanish Federation of Islamic Religious Entities, called the student’s complaint “absolutely ridiculous,” saying the “Koran prohibits the consumption of ham, not the discussion of it.”

My Spanish isn’t too good, but I think the teacher also called the ham complaint ridiculous and grotesque.

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Comments

  1. Bill Leonard says:

    And why is any non-muslim surprised?

  2. I was in Cadiz when Franco was in power. There were a lot of bad things, but political correctness was not one of them.

    How amazing that Spain has changed so much.

  3. I would take Franco over the current mass hysteria any day.

  4. Bill, it seems like you might be saying all Muslims are crazy fanatics.

    I hope that’s not the case.

    Now let me tell you about a place in Los Gatos, about 15 minutes away from where I live.

    Several women live there, they never wear shoes, they kneel on a hardwood floor for about 10 hours a day and pray. Seven days a week they pray all day and that’s basically all they do and all they will do until they die.

    And they’re not considered crazy or fanatic. They’re wonderfully devout nuns.

    I’m no fan of George W. Bush, but I thought he showed signs of greatness right after 9/11. And one thing I admired most was his quick call against making negative generalizations about Muslims.

  5. greeneyeshade says:

    Did Bill and BadaBing notice that even a Muslim official said the student was being ridiculous? If anti-jihadis like Daniel Pipes and Reuel Marc Gerecht can say, as they have, that all Muslims are not our enemies, it’s good enough for me.

  6. I would take Franco over the current mass hysteria any day.

    How nice to know you prefer fascism to democracy.

  7. Richard Nieporent says:

    As usual the Muslim apologists appear whenever some example of Muslim fanaticism is reported. Was it really necessary to falsely accuse some of the commenters of stating that all Muslims are fanatics? Even worse, why would you denigrate the lifestyle of nuns? They are not trying to force you to conform to their religious beliefs unlike some members of the Muslim religion.

  8. Seems like a rather ham-fisted application of religious doctrine to me…

  9. Richard, I don’t believe the desire to convert others is exclusively the habit of Muslims. I have yet to have had a Muslim ring my door bell for that purpose–yet well meaning followers of Jesus do it all the time.

    Why would I call into question the daily routine of women who live in austere conditions and do nothing but pray all day? Because it appears to have a little to do with religion and a lot to do with psychopathology.

    The fact that the Catholic Church is so large seems to make it OK.

    Looking at the behavior objectively, it appears like a terrible, abusive cult.

    The fact that they pray to Jesus instead of Allah shouldn’t make any difference, but in the eyes of some, it seems to make all the difference in the world.

    I question that.

  10. Richard Nieporent says:

    Why would I call into question the daily routine of women who live in austere conditions and do nothing but pray all day? Because it appears to have a little to do with religion and a lot to do with psychopathology.

    Robert, for someone who feels that he must come to the defense of Muslims, it is disconcerting that you would show such prejudice towards another religion. What business is it of yours if they do pray all day? I don’t know what your problem is with the Catholic Church but it unseemly of you to show such open hostility towards Catholics.

  11. Richard Aubrey says:

    Robert Wright seems to have a problem with Western Civ. “Hey, hey, ho, ho….etc.”
    Conflating praying with beheading, jihad, terror attacks.
    The next step will be to pretend the question is which religion is worst, according to its founding documents and historicall actions. The actual question is who is blowing up people from Thailand to NYC, from Sweden to the Phillipines, conducting rape war against ethnic Norwegian and Swedish women, who has run the Jews out of Malmo, who is behind a Dutch politician’s view that there is no future for Jews in Holland due to Muslim violence against them. AT THIS TIME.
    So, Robert, give us some words on the Crusades, huh?

  12. Richard N,

    I’m afraid your religious prejudices might be clouding your thinking.

    I have no hostility toward Catholicism nor toward Islam nor toward those who ring my doorbell who try to convert me. Nor do I have hostility toward atheists.

    It is no business of mine if somebody wants to pray all day? Well, if they’re doing what Paul suggested, that we pray incessantly, then these individuals are a lot more devout than I could ever hope to be. But if their behavior is a result of brainwashing due to sleep and food deprivation and other brainwashing techniques like constant repetition, total dependency and total obedience, then there’s nothing devout about it. It’s abuse.

    Richard, if you were on your knees reciting the Koran, day after day for 10 hours a day and you had no freedom and you were deprived of food and sleep, you would probably develop a rather positive attitude toward Allah. As would I. Most people respond to brainwashing. And brainwashing, though it involves reciting verse, has nothing to do with religion.

    My point which I had hoped to make was that you’ll find psychopathology in all religions, and that we seem to tolerate the psychopathology that feels culturally closer to home.

    Cults hide within religions and cults are not good.

    The Jihadists are deranged–and some are so dangerous they should be locked up for life–if not executed.

    But there are pockets of Opus Dei that are just as deranged, though probably not as dangerous.

    I’m tolerant of all religions but I don’t believe that cults within religions are immune from being criticized.

    Cutls can be dangerous to the individual members and dangerous to others.

    See the Rick Ross Institute for more information on cults, if you’re interested.

    If I touched a nerve with you by mentioning certain behaviors within the Catholic Church, well, I’m sorry. Upsetting people isn’t productive except to satisfy the desire to express hostility and I feel no hostility toward you–or the Catholic Church.

    Richard A,

    Your belief that Muslims are more prone to violence and intolerance than other religions is a view I don’t share. Fortunately, it is still, at this point, a fringe view.

    Thomas Jefferson wanted to put an end to tyranny over the minds of men.

    And for that reason, I believe he’d oppose cults of all kinds and, of course, religious prejudice and jingoism.

  13. Badabing,

    I’ve been giving some thought to your comment.

    My first reaction was, But you don’t know how bad Franco was!

    But looking back on it, it was kind of nice that nobody talked about politics. Just art, music, sports.

    I’m not sure I’d like going back to Spain.

    People seemed more interesting when they watched their words carefully.

    Spaniards are a crazy bunch. I’m not sure their new found freedom is something they’ve learned to handle quite yet.

  14. Robert:

    I think the heart of the matter here is that you do not believe that prayer has any value. Because you don’t see prayer as having any use, doing it all day is a waste to you.

    You say the nuns have no freedom – were they forced to join the convent? Are they being held against their will? Or are they doing something that you don’t understand for reasons that you don’t understand – and therefore you can’t imagine that they want to do what they are doing – and are happy to do what they are doing.

    CharleneF

  15. Richard Nieporent says:

    If I touched a nerve with you by mentioning certain behaviors within the Catholic Church, well, I’m sorry. Upsetting people isn’t productive except to satisfy the desire to express hostility and I feel no hostility toward you–or the Catholic Church.

    Sorry Robert but that won’t wash. Once again you jump to an incorrect conclusion. I am not Catholic.

  16. Richard Aubrey says:

    Robert Wright.
    A fringe view??? Well, watch out for them Amish nutcases. The other point is, the issues I mentioned are not committed by Amish. Or Presbys or Hindus or Buddhists. You might want to ask the Norwegian women who dye their hair to appear non-Norwegian if it’s Wiccans they fear.
    You conflate, as if we are a class which cannot point it out for fear of a grade, praying and mass murder.
    You have been in a classroom too long. We do not depend on you for a grade and so we are not required to keep quiet.

  17. Charlene,

    I don’t agree. For one, I don’t think my personal belief in prayer has anything to do with the points I attempted to make. Second, I happen to have a strong belief in prayer, I pray every day, and what Paul said, as I wrote above, is something I embrace. It you read more carefully, you will see I was talking about tolerance, psychopathology, cults and brainwashing, not prayer. Theology and the psychology of religion are quite apart from religion itself. You start mixing them and then thought goes out the window and discussion is pointless–unless you’re preaching to the choir, in which case you end up feeling better about yourself and that’s about it.

    Richard N.,

    only you would know if I touched a nerve. I didn’t say your emotional defense of catholicism was due to the fact you happened to be one. My religion, your religion, and Charlene’s religion shouldn’t be a factor in the discussion. Nor should cultural based prejudice color one’s opinions. My intended point was that your response seemed based more on emotion than reason. I meant that as honest feedback, not as an insult or as a speculation about your religious beliefs.

    Richard A.,

    I really wish your writing/thinking style didn’t force me to read your posts several times before I believe I grasp what you’re saying. This time, after several readings, I still can’t understand what you’re saying. Perhaps I’m not informed about what’s happening in Norway and I lack knowledge of the Amish. I don’t know. As for your hostility toward the teaching profession, that is something I remember we’ve been agreement about in the past. I’m sorry, though, that you’re borrowing from one of your reservoirs of anger in order to denounce rather than disagree. But if you want to accuse me of being woefully ignorant of current events in Scandinavia and the history of the Amish, I plead guilty.

  18. Richard Aubrey says:

    Yeah, Robert. You don’t have a clue about, say, carbeques in Paris, the Jews late of Malmo, Ayan Hirsi Ali run out of Holland by threats of violence, Molly Norris advised by the FBI to change her name and go underground to hide from Muslim death threats, and Hasan was probably a Wiccan. And the whole thing is the same as nuns praying.

    And, if your ignorance is actual and not an excuse, you think those who know what’s going on have some problem. If you do honestly plead ignorance, then a corollary would be to not condemn others who do know better.
    I am not hostile to the teaching profession. But I am trying to get you to understand that only your students are forced to pretend not to know better. They depend on professed belief in your stuff for a grade. The rest of us are not. You might want to work on making that distinction clearer in your own mind.

  19. Richard Nieporent says:

    My intended point was that your response seemed based more on emotion than reason. I meant that as honest feedback, not as an insult or as a speculation about your religious beliefs.

    Robert, give it a rest. My pointing out your bigotry towards Catholics it not an “emotional” response.

  20. Richard A.,

    My ignorance of the things that you mention is real. To say that this ignorance shows that I’m ignorant in extended areas is a logical statement, which I find refreshing, giving the lapses of logic above. And I will take your advice and give more thought about how I impact my students.

    Richard N.,

    Raising questions about certain Catholic orders and drawing comparisons with them to other religious orders which are not mainstream in America was an attempt to expose bigotry, it was not an example of bigotry. It’s like questioning Al Sharpton’s tactics and then being called a bigot against blacks. I have no bigotry against Catholics and for you to say so means your reaction was emotional or my questions were carelessly worded. I tend to think the former. In any case, I have no bigotry toward any religion. But questions? Yes. I have a lot of questions.