Principals won’t be judged on scores

Principals won’t be judged “effective” or “highly effective” based on  students’ progress, reports Justin Baeder in On Performance.

In September, the Department of Education proposed using growth in test scores — at least one grade level in an academic year — to determine which districts and schools are eligible for federal  education grants. The National Association of Elementary and Secondary Principals protested, saying principals shouldn’t be held “accountable for outcomes far behind their control.”

“Nonetheless, it’s likely that many principals will find student growth factored into their evaluations thanks to changes to state laws” designed to qualify for Race to the Top funding, Baeder writes.

If teachers can be judged, in part, on their students’ progress, why not principals?

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Comments

  1. I think if you read this article and substitute “teacher” for every “principal” that you see, you’ll get the whole reasons behind why teachers and teachers unions are so up in arms about the evaluation model coming down the pike with Race to the Top. I think any highly qualified teacher would agree that accountability to student learning and growth is key to what we do. Most teachers I know do not have a problem with being held accountable in their classrooms for what they are responsible for teaching. The problem lies in how/what those standards of accountability will look like and be evaluated upon. Apparently, this problem also exists for administrators. Personally, I think that if teachers are going to be held to the fire with accountability standards, then so do principal. Initially, principals were known as the “master teacher” in the building. If that’s the case, the master teacher should be held to higher standards than everyone else.

    I hear from a lot of friends in the business field that this is a simple solution. In business, you set criteria for assessment and you either meet that criteria or you don’t. The only difference between business and education is that our “product” is the intellect, behavior and social education of still-developing humans. They aren’t cogs and to create a system by which to measure “achievement” when achievement is different for each individual is near impossible. For teacher OR principals.

  2. Even though it will cause a rise in unemployment statistics, the Department of Education needs to go.

  3. Roger Sweeny says:

    The only difference between business and education is that our “product” is the intellect, behavior and social education of still-developing humans. They aren’t cogs and to create a system by which to measure “achievement” when achievement is different for each individual is near impossible. For teacher OR principals.

    But we have to decide what teachers to hire and who to pay what. And we do. The question is, can we develop systems that are better than the ones we have now? It may not be possible. On the other hand, when union people or ed school people say it can’t be done, I can’t forget how much of a stake they have in the present systems.