Edujobs backer covets reform funds

Forget about school reform: Rep. David R. Obey, D-Wisconsin, chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, wants to use $800 million in reform funds to pay educators’ salaries. His proposed amendment would shift $500 million from Race to the Top to partially — very partially — offset the cost of a $10 billion education jobs bill. Another $200 million would come from the Teacher Incentive Fund, which helps districts create pay-for-performance programs, reports Education Week. The final $100 million would come from innovation funds, apparently hitting charter schools.

“Mr. Obey has said, “When a ship is sinking, you don’t worry about redesigning a room, you worry about keeping it afloat,” (Obey spokesman Ellis) Brachman said. “He is not opposed to education reform. But he believes that keeping teachers on the job is an important step.”

Maybe the ship is sinking because it’s overloaded,” writes EIA Intercepts.

Obey is bucking the administration to maintain the status quo, writes Flypaper.

Dropout Nation jumps in.

Arne Duncan should give a little to keep teachers working, writes John Thompson on This Week in Education.

If the purpose of reform is to help schools, why push full speed ahead, as the educators who should be implementing these innovations are cut? Teachers have repeatedly seen the fiascoes that occur as schools buy hot new initiatives, but without funding the people necessary to do the work.

Nobody really knows how many education jobs are in danger.

Update: Why give more money to “a system that blindly allows effective teachers to be laid off but keeps those who do poor work but have been on the job longer? asks a Washington Post editorial.

President Obama has threatened to veto the bill if it includes Obey’s amendment.

About Joanne

Comments

  1. And there’s NOWHERE else in the $64 BILLION dollar DOE budget that he can pull money from?

  2. “Mr. Obey has said, “When a ship is sinking, you don’t worry about redesigning a room, you worry about keeping it afloat,” (Obey spokesman Ellis) Brachman said. “He is not opposed to education reform. But he believes that keeping teachers on the job is an important step.”
    +1

  3. I vote to eliminate the DOE; it was created as a political payoff to the NEA for their help in getting President Carter elected and its presence hasn’t improved anything. However, back in the real world, I’d suggest starting with central office types with lots of ed-school grad degrees and fat salaries, like the ones who assured me that having my incoming freshman take summer-school geometry with kids who had failed it the previous year would provide adequate preparation for honors algebra II in September. This was the same crowd who wouldn’t let him take keyboarding because “he wasn’t in HS yet” but he could take the math because he had finished honors algebra I in 8th grade.

    Years ago, I remember reading a comparison of the central office personnel at DCPS and the Archdiocese of Baltimore (almost exactly the same number of students in the two systems); the Archdiocese had something like 15 and DCPS had something like 1300. I’m sure it hasn’t changed and I’m sure they’re not the only system with hugely bloated bureaucracies that serve no academically useful purpose.

  4. I’d prefer to take 100 billion dollars from the Department of Defense.

  5. SuperSub says:

    Mike… that would definitely solve our educational problems… pretty soon our educational system would model that of Iran or China.

    momof4… I completely agree… I cannot name a single way that the federal DOE has improved the education of any of my students or benefited me in my career. I had a talk with my dept supervisor recently, and we both agreed that schools would do much better if funding was primarily done at the local level.

Trackbacks

  1. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by JoanneLeeJacobs. JoanneLeeJacobs said: New blog post: Edujobs backer covets reform funds http://bit.ly/de6CS4 […]