Too young for college?

On Spotlight: A 13-year-old home-schooled girl is suing to get into community college classes. The college, which offers dual-enrollment classes for high school students, says she’s too young to associate with adult students.

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Comments

  1. My daughter took a CC class as a 13-year-old and had no problems, but we had discussed the fact that she looked much older. When she was asked for a date with a 22-year-old classmate, she just thanked him and explained her age situation. Anyone mature enough to do that level work should be able to handle the other aspects as well.

  2. Anyone mature enough to do that level work should be able to handle the other aspects as well.

    Not really. I’ve known too many kids who were able to handle work at that level but were utterly unable to handle the rest of it. Intellectual and emotional maturity are very different.

  3. Cardinal Fang says:

    I know of quite a few homeschoolers who took community college classes, and even classes at four year colleges, at age 13. Some succeeded, some did not– just like older students. The college should not be required to dumb down or censor the material for younger students, but as long as the parents are OK with their daughter taking the class, it shouldn’t be up to the community college to keep her out.

  4. Richard Aubrey says:

    There are enough young women from public schools who are induced to do stupid things at eighteen when away from home for the first time.
    IMO, at thirteen, the kid would know she’s a kid, not a horny young adult with no buzzkilling parents looking over her shoulder.
    Probably, paradoxically, safer.
    Which, I presume, is the subject, not the subjects.

  5. Once again, the idiocy of college systems nationwide and idiotic laws to deny motivated students the ability to finish an education early is showing itself again.

    There was a case some years ago in California where they wanted to make a 15 year old go to high school, but there was one minor problem, the 15 year old already had a bachelor’s degree from a state university, and couldn’t get admitted to a master’s program until he turned 16.

    Fortunately for him, a judge in California determined that a person who holds a bachelor’s degree has no business enrolled as a student in high school (so the kid wound up taking a year off).

    I wonder what would have happened to this nation if many of the great inventors of the past were forced to attend the public schools we have today?

  6. Depending on the subject there’s a work-around for the student, here. Let Mom enroll and let the kid attend and “take notes” for her absent mother, who will always be unable to attend. If the teacher agrees, let her in on the con and grade the kid’s tests. When she’s old enough, she can formally enroll in upper-division classes and then take the GRE. I know a student who did something along this line (teachers allowed him to audit unofficially) who took the GRE (Math) before he turned 17, entered grad school without a high school diploma or college degree, and got his M.S. (Math) before he turned 20.

  7. Bill: “I wonder what would have happened to this nation if many of the great inventors of the past were forced to attend the public schools we have today?”

    Richard Arkwright was homeschooled. Cyrus McCormick was homeschooled. Thomas Edison was homeschooled. Mary Putnam Jacobi was homeschooled. Bertrand Russell was homeschooled. Yehudi Menuhin was homeschooled.

  8. Eric Jablow says:

    Charles Fefferman started college at 12, and earned his PhD at 19.

  9. Here in Texas, you may have precocious 13 year old 9th graders sitting next to 20 year old students.

    Nobody seems to get upset at that situation.

  10. Yes! Too young. One of our children skipped a grade and that was quite a challenge. 15? That’s fine. But not 13.