Education 2010: More high-poverty schools

The 2010 Condition of Education study, released by the U.S. Education Department, shows a rise in the percentage of high-poverty schools where more than three quarters of students are eligible for a subsidized lunch. By 2008, 17 percent of schools hit the high-poverty category.

Teachers at high-poverty schools are less likely to have earned a master’s degree and regular professional certification. Only 68 percent of 12th graders in high-poverty schools graduated with a diploma in 2008, compared to 91 percent in low-poverty schools. High-poverty graduates are far less likely to enroll in a four-year college.

However, in 4th-grade reading, the poverty achievement gap has decreased.

There was some positive news from the report, AP notes.

The percentage of 16 to 24-year-old students not enrolled in school, and who do not have a high school diploma or equivalent degree, has dropped from 14 to 8 percent between 1980 and 2008. The total number of college post-secondary degrees earned has also risen markedly, from 2.3 to 3.1 million from 1997-1998 and 2007-2008.

For all students, reading and math scores improved for 9- and 13-year-olds from the early 1970s to 2008, but stayed about the same for 17-year-olds.

Education continues to pay off:

  • In 2008, among young adults ages 25–34 who worked full time throughout a full year, those with a bachelor’s degree earned 28 percent more than young adults with an associate’s degree, 53 percent more than young adult high school completers, and 96 percent more than young adults who did not earn a high school diploma. The median of the earnings for young adults with a bachelor’s degree was $46,000; for those with an associate’s degree, $36,000; for high school completers, $30,000; and for those who did not earn a high school diploma or equivalent certificate, $23,500.

About three of four students graduated on time with a regular diploma in 2007; two thirds go directly to college. About 57 percent of full-time students at four-year colleges complete a bachelor’s degree within six years.

Overall, 89 percent of 25- to 29-year-olds have at least a high school diploma or GED,  31 percent a bachelor’s degree and 7 percent a master’s degree or higher.

Between 1971 and 2009, the high school completion rate increased from 59 to 89 percent for Blacks and from 48 to 69 percent for Hispanics. The White-Black gap in high school attainment decreased from 23 to 6 percentage points, and the White-Hispanic gap decreased from 33 to 26 percentage points.

Women made up 57 percent of college enrollment in 2008 bachelor’s degrees and the report estimates that will grow to 59 percent by 2019. However, recession could persuade more men they need higher education, speculates Phill Izzo on a Wall Street Journal blog.

See The Quick and the Ed for more.

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Comments

  1. At some point, we have to get tired of throwing money at the issue, and trying program after program and fad after fad, and admit that there is a genetic component to the ability to work hard and achieve success… As someone who hopes for a Star Trek utopian future, no one wants it to NOT be true more than me… But it’s there…

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