Cheaters (and teachers) prosper

Students are incredibly clever and inventive when it comes to cheating on tests, writes Arthur Goldstein on Gotham Schools. A young teacher filled him on the latest techniques, including how to cheat with a water bottle.

If the teacher’s pay depends on students’ scores, Golstein wonders, why should she crack down on cheaters?

About Joanne

Comments

  1. (Joanne): “If the teacher’s pay depends on students’ scores, Golstein wonders, why should she crack down on cheaters?”

    Umm…because the tests that I give serve only my purposes (pacing instruction, perhaps) and do not determine either students’ grades or my pay, maybe?

    “TEACHER” is an anagram for “CHEATER”. That’s why the text with the answers in it is the teacher’s edition. It is a clear conflict of interest for teachers to grade their own students. For all that they complain about the burden of grading, many teachers want this power over students, for some reason.

  2. One Spanish teacher of mine left her teacher’s manual out where it was possible a student seated close enough to it could read the multiple choice answers of next chapter exam.

    A student scribbling down the answers may have been too obvious and caught by the teacher. Unless they had a good memory and could store the answers in their head till class was dismissed.

  3. I had one of the school’s favorite kids, straight A’s, ASB, popular family.

    I caught her cheating. I knew no one would believe me, so I set a trap for her the next week to provide undeniable evidence. (I basically created a fake set of answers)

    Not only did she use EVERY SINGLE ONE of the fake answers, you could see where she had actually written them on her test.

    Of course when I confronted her she tearfully denied it, despite the evidence. Sadly, so did her parents, fellow teachers and my administration. Even after I walked them through my evidence. In fact, I got grief for deliberately attempting to decieve her.

  4. “If the teacher’s pay depends on students’ scores, Golstein wonders, why should she crack down on cheaters?”

    Because to do otherwise would be dishonest?

    Geez, get this one to an ethics class.

  5. And in the water bottle video, we see the sad result of cheating, someone who thinks that cellophane tape is called “duct tape”. The future is bleak.

  6. In the bottle video, we see a student who was able to distill everything he needed to know in the course to about 15 lines. He then printed out those lines, reduced them, and cleverly taped them to the inside label of a water bottle.

    The thing is, if a student is smart enough to distill the course down to those 15 lines, the student isn’t going to have to cheat, and will probably already have the 15 lines memorized.