Fighting Sioux shall fight no more forever

The University of North Dakota Fighting Sioux will need a new name: A state Supreme Court ruling and a Board of Higher Education decision have retired “Fighting Sioux.”

The university wants to move from Division II to Division I athletics. The NCAA considers the nickname “hostile and offensive.” One Sioux tribe has supported the name, but another tribal council has not.

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Comments

  1. One Sioux tribe has supported the name, but another tribal council has not.

    This makes the name “Fighting Sioux” oddly appropriate. Perhaps “Squabbling Sioux” would be less hostile.

  2. Richard Nieporent says:

    The NCAA considers the nickname “hostile and offensive.”

    So how come Notre Dame’s fighting Irish is allowed?

  3. Richard,

    The difference is Notre Dame historically was a school for Irish by Irish American Catholics… “Fighting Irish” described themselves and was a name chosen for themselves.

    Mascots derived from Native American culture are more akin to animal mascots in the sense that they were often chosen because of their supposed “savage” nature… and many (though certainly not all) American Indians find such associations offensive.

  4. Mark Roulo says:

    “The difference is Notre Dame historically was a school for Irish by Irish American Catholics… ‘Fighting Irish’ described themselves and was a name chosen for themselves.”

    I’ll buy that.

    Now how about the support that the Minnesota Vikings get?

    🙂

    -Mark R.

  5. Mike Curtis says:

    How about “UND Football Team?” Their mascot could be a smiling snowman…unless of course it’s not considered too white for some viewers.

  6. George Larson says:

    Do the Irish call themselves Irish or is it word the English use to call identify the inhabitants of Eire? The Swedes do not call themselves Vikings and they do not call themselves Swedes. I think most Native Americans use English words to identify other nationalities. Hungarians are really Magyars. The word Hungary refers to a Slavic tribe that no longer exists.

  7. Richard Nieporent says:

    Jab, it was a rhetorical question. The real reason is political correctness. The funny thing is that “the NCAA has exempted the names “Illini” and “Fighting Illini” from its ban on “hostile and abusive” Native American imagery”.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chief_Illiniwek

    However, they did have to stop using Chief Illiniwek as their school mascot.

  8. Another victory for the PC police forces that divide America into the tribes that we’re not allowed to use as mascots.

  9. I’m not sure about UC Santa Cruz.

    Banana Slugs with Attitude?

  10. I just checked and found that Dartmouth athletics uses the name Big Green, which suggests that the Indians no longer exist; undoubtedly for the same PC reason. In my era, Dartmouth was the Indians, since the school was founded to teach Indians.

  11. Richard Nieporent says:

    I just checked and found that Dartmouth athletics uses the name Big Green, which suggests that the Indians no longer exist; undoubtedly for the same PC reason. In my era, Dartmouth was the Indians, since the school was founded to teach Indians

    For the same reason the Stanford Indians became the Stanford Cardinal. No not the bird but the color. I guess they were afraid that PETA would object.

  12. Richard Aubrey says:

    If you’re interested in aggressive imagery, “fighting” something is cool.
    But it would have to be realistic.
    “fighting Diggers” wouldn’t have any meaning. They were the ones everybody else picked on.
    I’d say, take it as an honor.
    After all, nobody remembers the Sioux for their architecture or lyric poetry.

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