National standards internationally

How do national standards work in other nations? Fordham’s new report looks at standards and testing in Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, the Netherlands, Russia, Singapore and South Korea.

Flypaper’s Amber Winkler offers some teasers:

Testing is a hot topic in South Korea.

The Netherlands funds private schools, including religious schools, if they follow  national requirements and standards and give national tests.

Singapore is trying to balance national and local control.

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Comments

  1. The scary thing is that the US isn’t far from national standards. After all, NCLB passed, and still remains in effect. There don’t appear to be progressive thinking or innovations on the proverbial horizon under the leadership of our current DOE head, and, American citizens overall don’t consider education to be a top priority. So, pretty much whatever the government wants to do, they’ll accomplish it. Nobody is going to put forth much time or effort fighting.

  2. National standards are much easier to create and enforce in many countries because most of the world’s countries are much smaller, and much more homogeneous in population, than the U.S.

  3. NORTH OF 49TH says:

    I hope this report is more accurate about other countries than it is about Canada. Canada has neither national standards nor national testing. In the table at the end, the report describes the Educational Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) as a “national” office. It is nothing of the kind. It is a quasi-government ETS-wannabe strictly confined to Ontario. The so-called “high stakes” testing for high school graduation can be circumvented (those who fail can submit “portfolios” and take a special class and then they will graduate, literate or not).

    Only 3 of the ten provinces and three territories report any kind of provincial testing, none of which is norm-referenced. Since “standards” and test rubrics change every year, progress of lack of it is difficult to track.

    Not that “national standards” would be a good idea — Canada’s population is as diverse, maybe more so in parts of the country, than is that of the USA. Nunavut and Quebec have languages other than English as their official languages.

  4. “National standards are much easier to create and enforce in many countries because most of the world’s countries are much smaller, and much more homogeneous in population, than the U.S.”

    This certainly isn’t true for India, with 22 official languages and almost a thousand dialects.

    The Fordham report claims that “…technical education in India is often regarded as the best in the world.”

    Hmm, by whom? It used to be a merciless meritocracy, but progressivism has enlightened India over the last several decades. For example, there used to be five or six Indian Institutes of Technology, real world-class universities with a deserved reputation for turning out extremely bright and competent engineers.

    There was a push to increase the reach of this system, and the solution was to re-classify 2nd-, 3rd- and lower-ranked universities as part of the IIT group.

    Presto chango! The goal was met, and without stressing out the third-raters who suddenly found themselves in an IIT.