Schoolhouse Rock for the 21st century

How a bill becomes a law in 2009.

Via Instapundit.

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Comments

  1. Funny. Also profoundly stupid. The last panel in particular is quite useful: if you agree with it, you’re a moron.

  2. Besides demonstrating that Republicans are bitter about having been decisively rejected by American voters, what’s the upshot of that cartoon supposed to be? And the Republicans *did* get all kinds of concessions in the Senate, despite being very much in the minority. More, frankly, than they should have since they benefit from super-majority rules.

    Nobody likes a sore loser.

  3. Andy Freeman says:

    > And the Republicans *did* get all kinds of concessions in the Senate, despite being very much in the minority. More, frankly, than they should have since they benefit from super-majority rules.

    How about telling us about those concessions and whether they made things better or worse?

    It’s one thing to argue that the concessions weren’t “earned”, it’s quite another to argue that they were bad.

  4. I think some of the concessions were good and some were bad, but that’s irrelevant. The point is that the cartoon is mostly just sour grapes that the Democrats mostly got their way: the Democrats weren’t “shoving” the bill “down the throats” of anybody (as the cartoon says) – the public favored the bill, favored the Democrats’ handling of the bill, the Democrats had big legislative majorities and the cartoon consists mostly of whining about those facts.

    The cartoon only makes sense if you think Republicans are entitled to significantly determine legislative outcomes despite being very much in the minority in Congress. But that’s silliness.

    If conservatives and Republicans want to get to make the laws, they should make a point of actually getting elected, rather than whining about not having control.

  5. Glad you guys liked it!

  6. And actually, Andy, I think it’s possible we sort of agree on the overarching principle, here, which is that legislation ought to be judged on its merits, not on the extent to which it meets some arbitrary criteria of procedural inclusiveness. That’s precisely my objection to the cartoon, which is more fussy (Obama and the Dems are bullying us around!) than substantive.

  7. superdestroyer says:

    Paul,

    How can the public favor anything that they do not understand in the least and when the polticians themselves have little idea of what is in it.

    The stimulus bill was rushed through just like the financial bailout bill that has now become a disaster.

    The public think they are going to get free money from the government when they will be paying higher taxes for the rest of the lives to pay off the interest on nearly $1 trillion in additional debt.

  8. superdestroyer –

    I don’t understand your objection. The public can favor things they don’t understand. What’s the contradiction in that? You might think the public was wrong, or ill-informed, but so what? Since when did people only have opinions about things they understood in great depth?

  9. If in doubt, just bring out that Lenin or Hitler reference. It saves you from actually thinking.

  10. L. C. Burgundy says:

    Glad to see the fist pumpers for Obama are out in force. Personally, I’m predicting inflation rates in the double digits within 2 years.

  11. Andy Freeman says:

    > Since when did people only have opinions about things they understood in great depth?

    My cat has opinions, but I’m pretty sure that we don’t want to give them much weight.

  12. Mom in Georgia says:

    Here is some math for you=
    If you spent 1 million dollars ($1,000,000) EVERY DAY since Christ was born, you would have spent less than the Democratic administration (with the help of three “republicans”) spent in one day, last week.

  13. This bill is loaded with pork, was shoved through so fast no one could have read the whole thing, and will probably have the opposite effect of what Congress thinks it’s voting for. Rather like Bush’s PATRIOT bill…