Police drive Detroit pol’s son to private school

Detroit Council President Monica Conyers uses her police driver and car to chauffeur one of her sons to a private school 15 miles from the city, reports the Detroit News. Conyers is married to Rep. John Conyers, a 43-year congressional veteran. She says her critics are “jealous” of her power.  After all, President Obama’s children get a security escort to school.

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Comments

  1. Yikes. But then Detroit has so much extra money sloshing around in its budget it only makes sense to provide the best for the best.

    I’m certainly not jealous of the folks who voted for her or the taxpayers there.

  2. L. C. Burgundy says:

    Assume politicians in Detroit are crooked and grossly misuse city or state resources unless proven otherwise.

  3. Well L.C. Burgundy, you obviously don’t keep up on the events occurring in Detroit. If you did you’d know that assumption isn’t required when it comes to Detroit politicians. Conviction trumps assumption every time.

  4. Detroit…Chicago – which city elects more slime?

  5. Robert Wright says:

    Left out of the story was the point that Conyers made that she was in the car with her son so the police officer was driving both of them.

    An officer is assigned to accompany Conyers and to drive her places and it doesn’t have to be when she’s on official business.

    She didn’t violate the regulations as they are written.

    If the good citizens of Detroit have a problem with Conyers use of the car and the driver, then the regulations need to be amended.

    What I find more disturbing is Conyer’s temper, her outbursts, her insults. She doesn’t seem to be a particularly likable person. However, it appears she made legal use of the police car and driver.

    The article by the Detroit News was not objective journalism.

  6. Cardinal Fang says:

    Also left out of the story was Conyers’ claim, backed up by the police, that the police had told her that she has a driver assigned to her, so she is not supposed to be driving her son to school by herself. I don’t understand why a City Council President needs an assigned driver– is the city really that dangerous? — but Conyers seems to be following the rules here.

    She may be an unlikable person, but that doesn’t imply that she is also a corrupt person. If she is merely unlikable, that’s for the voters to deal with when she runs for re-election.

  7. This trial isn’t occurring in a court of law but in the court of public opinion and the standard of evidence is bit slacker.

    One would think that, in view of the descent of Kwame Kilpatrick, Detroit politicians might try to be a bit more circumspect and try to avoid controversy but that’s not how things are done around the Motor City. Whether it’s the Detroit school board or the city government, the city government’s treated as if it were a third world government and there’s just not that much that’s not for sale. While there are exceptions the general tenor of Detroit government is, and has been for quite a while, to get while the getting is good.

    Coleman Young set the tone for the city by running his administration as if Detroit were his personal fief but Young, however despicable I found his politics, wasn’t a dope like some of his successors. Young’s flamboyance created a public expectation that a less colorful but less corrupt man like Dennis Archer couldn’t meet. So he got thrust aside by Kwame Kilpatrick, the Partay Mayor.

  8. “I don’t understand why a City Council President needs an assigned driver– is the city really that dangerous?”

    Yes. Thanks to politicians like Conyers. Of course, they’re also dead set against ordinary people carrying the means of defending themselves.

  9. Andy Freeman says:

    > She didn’t violate the regulations as they are written.

    > If the good citizens of Detroit have a problem with Conyers use of the car and the driver, then the regulations need to be amended.

    “followed the rules” isn’t actually good enough or an excuse.

    It merely means that she can’t be convicted of a crime.